Does it work on a Raspberry Pi or other small computer?

Has someone tried to get Xojo-made console apps to run on a Raspberry Pi or similar Linux-supporting system?

Oh great. When I delete the original question, even if there are no answers, then the question goes but the title remains.

Gotta love this immature forum…

Anyway. I just realize that the answer to my question is: No. Because the Raspberry Pi doesn’t use an Intel CPU. Man, I’m getting old.

[quote=69794:@Thomas Tempelmann]Oh great. When I delete the original question, even if there are no answers, then the question goes but the title remains.

Gotta love this immature forum…
[/quote]
You deleted the post - not the entire topic
Restored your post

that said intel has the … galileo boards or something tiny like that which might be sufficient

Here’s the Galileo link:

Galileo Atom-Based SBC

[quote=69804:@Norman Palardy]You deleted the post - not the entire topic
Restored your post[/quote]
Uh, the idea was to delete the entire post because it was a stupid and superfluous question that had already been answered in the forum before.

However, thanks for pointing out the alternative. I had not even thought of asking the question for alternatives.

Has anybody used Galileo Atom-Based SBC with XOJO? How do I get started?

Pretty much the same as any Linux SBC -

  • Do your work on a normal Xojo platform.
  • Make sure that you’ve installed a Linux distro that meats the minimum for Xojo app comoatibility onto the CF / Flash drive and that the SBC boots and runs the GNOME environment properly.
  • Copy your built app to the CF / Flash drive
  • Boot the Gallileo SBC
  • Test your app.

I have just orderd one, keep you posted.

Friggin’ autocorrect - that should be meets, not meats!

This isn’t a “generic computer” like RaspPI is. This is an x86 Arduino like board. There is no monitor output (HDMI, VGA, etc). The integrated Linux is prepared to boot and talk to the Arduino Sketch program through the client USB port. It runs a very specific Linux dedicated for the board, so it’s not known if a Xojo console program finds a compatible environment to run. Chances are that won’t. :frowning:

There seem to be a number of of small x86 boards

http://liliputing.com/2012/10/more-small-pc-boards-with-x86-processors-for-75-or-less.html

@Martin Kvapil - have you had much success with it?

[quote=69794:@Thomas Tempelmann]Oh great. When I delete the original question, even if there are no answers, then the question goes but the title remains.

Gotta love this immature forum…

Anyway. I just realize that the answer to my question is: No. Because the Raspberry Pi doesn’t use an Intel CPU. Man, I’m getting old.[/quote]

Actually it does as the x86 cpu can be visualized on the ARM processor (exactly how Xojo exists on my Phone along with Windows 7 ;-))

I posted the procedure either here or at forums.realsoftware.com a while back when someone inquired. Can do it again if needed. Surprisingly, there isn’t much speed lag as compared to a native x86 processor. (IE my phone has 2.3Ghz quadcore arm processor and 3GB of ram…my primary dev system has 3Ghz quadcore x86 process and 10GB ram…xojo fully loads on my phone in 32 seconds while my pc takes 27 seconds) raspberry pi however is limited by ram and processor speed so if you virtualize an os I’d use x86 debian (Linux) or ReactOS (free windows) (not a memory hog like windows 7/8…not happening) when an OS is virtualized, it boots just as rasp-pi does normally no difference, no overlapping OS’s. And id only recommend running apps you’ve created with xojo (ie my robot logic and servo control handler :-)) and not Xojo itself as Xojo consumes much more memory than the PI is currently capable of.

So yes you can run x86 on an ARM processor without an extreme noticable difference. If your intentions are to stay cheap rasp-pi (only $35.00!) is a great computer for tinkering and making simple projects with Xojo like robots and home automation systems. But if you want quality and speed… Get something with a little more space and speed… generally, you get what you pay for :slight_smile:

[quote=87354:@Matthew Combatti]Actually it does as the x86 cpu can be visualized on the ARM processor (exactly how Xojo exists on my Phone along with Windows 7 ;-))

I posted the procedure either here or at forums.realsoftware.com a while back when someone inquired. Can do it again if needed. [/quote]

Yes, please post again ! It will be much appreciated. After reading time and again that Xojo apps cannot work on ARM, thats real interesting news !

Matthew, you really are an incredibly precious source of information. How could a clone of Windows be so little known after several years ? Thank you for sharing :slight_smile:

[quote=87354:@Matthew Combatti]Actually it does as the x86 cpu can be visualized on the ARM processor (exactly how Xojo exists on my Phone along with Windows 7 ;-))

I posted the procedure either here or at forums.realsoftware.com a while back when someone inquired. Can do it again if needed. [/quote]

Yes please!

Galaxy Note, I presume?

Would be great!

Completely lost track of ReactOS. Seems to be much more mature now than in the early days. Interesting concept of running Windows on an ARM processor. This would create great possibilities with Xojo!

It opens many possibilities since Intel CPUs are purposely underclocked, not even usually ruining at “normal” speed (well under “over-clocked”). So, a really cheap ARM computer with specs better than most IA-32/64 (x86) processors, can virtualize better in most cases “the real deal.” (Pretty sad). I will do a write-up for different devices, but in the meantime, become familiarized with at least what Qemu (the OS virtualizer) is and what libSDL is (provides access to devices and peripherals on an ARM board as if they were native hardware). There are a few options available, but the mentioned will suit most user’s needs (on any ARM board). Qemu can be initialized during boot (RPi method), or from within an already running OS environment.

If you wish to dabble in the meantime with OS emulation and have a smart device, Android users have a few options already provided in the play-store such as WinEmulator or the better choice “Limbo.” For iOS, if your device is unlocked (jailbroken), you can find the entire Qemu package or iVirtualBox in the Cydia store (free products, other options are paid). I only say dabble for proof-of-concept so you can see it is actually possible with any x-86 OS. I personally have dual-boot on my Galaxy Note 3 so that I may switch between Android and Windows 7 (the os state is saved during a switch), and allowing all cpu and memory to be devoted to one or the other. (Raspberry pi will only boot 1 system (the virtualizer) so there is no dual-boot options for RPi…at least performance would be greatly degraded attempting to load 2 OS’ s simultaneously) I don’t do much “hardcore development” with Xojo via my phone (unless my bluetooth keyboard is with me…‘swipe’ typing doesn’t recognize a lot of the language)…but that is how I’m “always online here, and able to test code and reply so quickly” (some have asked :-p) I can download something via the android browser, switch to Windows, and since you can access the device drives, open the downloaded file in windows Xojo and do what I need to do, save it, and upload it.

You truly can have Xojo with you always :slight_smile:

[quote=87478:@Matthew Combatti]I don’t do much “hardcore development” with Xojo via my phone (unless my bluetooth keyboard is with me…‘swipe’ typing doesn’t recognize a lot of the language)…but that is how I’m “always online here, and able to test code and reply so quickly” (some have asked :-p) I can download something via the android browser, switch to Windows, and since you can access the device drives, open the downloaded file in windows Xojo and do what I need to do, save it, and upload it.

You truly can have Xojo with you always :-)[/quote]

Thank you for these pointers. So you are using Limbo on your Galaxy Note ? That’s how you are able to run Xojo ?

Qemu is open source and has a number of configurable options available for compiling. Since theres a huge range of devices available, not all options are available in the qemu settings file that’s loaded by default. I manually set certain options in the source code specific to my device (phone), compiled the source, then wrote an app with basic4android that when opened executes the load-script for the customized Qemu. Limbo pretty much does this, only using the “generic qemu for arm” and provides options for most (not all) setting configurations. I suggested limbo because its already available and no “fanangling” needs to be done to get it up and running in minutes. I originally used limbo on my galaxy note 2 and it worked great (I merely enjoy dabbling with technology and seeing “how much better” I can make it…thus my own version).

No trace of Limbo or Winemulator in the Play Store. However, Qemu is there but with Linux only.

Could not find anything to install Windows.

I will try to install Linux and see if it runs Xojo apps for Linux. That’s a beginning of solution…