38303 - The note name is si, not ti ! (pdf)

Steps: Read the documentation “UserGuide-Framework.pdf” pages 102, 103.

Expected Result:
Real music note name: “si”

Actual Result:
Instead of si, we got Ti…

In short, this is a double typo.

BTW: no beta tester ever saw / report that ?

May it be that no one uses Xojo for multimedia projects ?

“Sol” is missing the “l” too.

Good catch Jule, bad memory Emile…

With my musician’s hat on…
There are a number of variants of ‘do-re-mi’, or ‘Solfge’, as it’s more properly known. There’s a good summary of it at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solfge - including discussions of Si, Sol etc. Back in the old days, it used to start Ut Re Mi; I’ve seen pieces of music in ‘Ut Minor’ before…
I note that Xojo’s not outputting Do Re Mi as text from notes, it’s just in an example; I’d hate to think of the work that would go into localising names of notes in the different forms of Solfge!

Thank you Hamish for the music complement info.

For the record: I do not have an idea of the % of people who knows that do, re, mi… is used as A, B, C, in English outside of the english speaking countries.

For one, I know that since the first bootleg of the Let it be project comes to day (from Paul McCartney who explain to the others whow its brand new song behaves).

Back to basics: I forgot to share the twos creen shots I’ve done (I uploaded them and forgot to share them here):


The text…


The comments on the code.

Unable to make change in the previous post. So: the image captions are reversed; you can understand that by yourself, but it is easier to understand with the propert caption text.

This is not fun: I can modify this entry but I couldn’t do that in the one that needed it !

I’m not a musician, but this is just a fun little example I made using the song “Do Re Mi” from The Sound of Music.

[quote=170002:@Emile Schwarz]Expected Result:
Real music note name: “si”

Actual Result:
Instead of si, we got Ti…[/quote]
Emile, Ti is correct in the US, where the example originates. There is no Si in our version.

Nor in the sound of music :stuck_out_tongue:
Just listen to Julie Andrews sing it

It’s quite clearly & distinctly Ti

And So (like sew)

And for any astute observers this is actually a DUPLICATE … <https://xojo.com/issue/38207>

INCREDIBLE !

I always think that the notes names are… universal !

So, sorry for the bad buz.

Solmisation, Solfge, Solfeggio, Sol-Fa, DoReMi or whatever it may be called is anything else than a standardized system. Not only that the “words” may be different, in some countries DO is not C but the Tonika.

WiseAssMode = True

The monk Guido D’Arezzo (around anno 1000) used the first syllables of the Prayer to John the Baptist. And those syllables were changed in different countries, partly simply because the original ones could not be sung so well (Ut <> Do), partly because of translation errors or language preferences.

So for the original wording you will find many variations of

UT queant laxis UT, DO, DOH
REsonare fibris RE
MIra gestorum MI
FAmuli tuorum FA, FAH
SOLve poluti SOL, SO, SOH
LAbii reatum LA, LAH
Sancte Iohannes SI, TI

WiseAssMode = False

If you want to install a Solmisation, you would have to consider a lot of national preferences (or give the user a way to define his own), I’m afraid.

And, considering in some german speaking countries the note “B” was mistakenly interpreted as “H”, also the note names differ. While a german trained in a musical high school knows the note names as being in alphabetic order, in school it is trained as being C D E F G A H C. The B is what the rest of the world calls Bb. What a mess!

We need a locale for notes :wink:

I like the story about the H so much – it’s so incredible!
Monasteries have been the predecessors of today’s copy shops, and at some time it was common to write the names of the notes when copying song sheets. This was done in broken black letter style, with very rectangular character shapes. And one monk forgot to close the lower shape o a “b” his was copying. Tada: The h was born!

Sorry but this is wrong.
I know in USA TI and SO as used instead of SI and SOL, but it’s still wrong.
This is probably due to the fact “SI” it too similar to the english pronunciation of “C”.

But it’s like to say that “Chicago” has to be written “Cicago”
(we read Chicago as KICAGO and Cicago as you americans)

See here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solfège#Fixed_do_solf.C3.A8ge

About the Xojo docs, since is taken from the “Sound of Music” it should be written then.

[quote=170364:@Massimo Valle]Sorry but this is wrong.
[/quote]
You’re assuming that the quote is based on musical notation
It’s not
Its based on the words from The Sound of Music which does NOT go the way you’re writing

[quote=170364:@Massimo Valle]
About the Xojo docs, since is taken from the “Sound of Music” it should be written then.[/quote]
http://documentation.xojo.com/index.php/NotePlayer
Where it now says
The following plays “do-re-mi-fa-so-la-ti-do”:
NotePlayer1.Instrument = 1
// Notes for Do Re Mi Fa So La Ti Do
// see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do-Re-Mi from The Sound of Music http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sound_of_Music
// (C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C)

[quote=170365:@Norman Palardy]You’re assuming that the quote is based on musical notation
It’s not
Its based on the words from The Sound of Music which does NOT go the way you’re writing
[/quote]

Yes, now.
But before the change, my assumption was correct.

It was just not documented what the assumption was.
It was always based on song from The Sound of Music.

You were still wrong :stuck_out_tongue:

[quote=170370:@Norman Palardy]It was just not documented what the assumption was.
It was always based on song from The Sound of Music.

You were still wrong :P[/quote]

Yes and this was not a bug, just a feature request :stuck_out_tongue: