Considering Mojave..

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  2. 6 months ago

    Sam R

    17 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Hengchun, Pingtung, Taiwan

    @Jean-YvesPochez what model of macbook is it ? "the" 12" macbook ?

    Yeah the very first 2015 MacBook, I replaced my 2008 Original MacBook Air with it. I like to have slow !@#$% machines for debugging and secondary things, like browsing the internet.

    @Michel B I have not installed Mojave yet (too busy being sick) but as I see it in the App Store, I foresee the customer telling me he is running it, and for some reason, my app he purchased in the MAS. So now, not only do I need to update all my apps to 64 bits, but also make sure they run under Mojave...

    Sorry to hear that you've been sick mate. Bodies are a chore.

  3. Paul S

    17 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Europe (Netherlands, Den Haag)

    @Michel B Well, it seems I will have to install Mojave on the Macbook, but the late 2011 iMac will not be blessed with 10.14.2, says the MAS.

    You could consider macOS Mojave Patcher Tool for Unsupported Macs .
    My advice is to do this only when you have another Mac as your main computer.

  4. Michel B

    18 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers RubberViews.com

    @Paul S You could consider macOS Mojave Patcher Tool for Unsupported Macs .
    My advice is to do this only when you have another Mac as your main computer.

    Hi Paul,

    Thank you for the pointer.

    i am aware of several such solutions. But I need a reliable work machine. I will install Mojave on the MacBook, and keep the iMac under safe High Sierra :)

  5. Philippe C

    18 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro, XDC Speakers Ottawa, Canada

    @Michel B ...but the late 2011 iMac will not be blessed with 10.14.2, says the MAS.

    Programmed obsolescence anyone ?

    Seven years is a pretty good run for a computer, but while it's true you can't run the latest OS on that machine anymore, you can still run 10.13 / 10.12, both of which still receive security fixes.

    My mom has a 2010 iMac on 10.13. I take that as a hint that we should get her a new computer in the next couple of years, but security-wise she's fine for at least that.

    Her previous computer was a top-of-the-line PowerMac G4 that she initially paid a lot of money for, but it ran for 9 years without a hitch. I only retired it (and replaced it with the iMac) because it was running 10.4 (from 2007) and some web sites she was visiting no longer rendered correctly. I was not concerned with security updates at the time like I am now!

  6. Tim J

    20 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Dehydrating in AZ

    @Michel B Well, that is a good excuse to buy a new machine

    Or - an even better excuse to NOT upgrade to Mojave :D .

  7. Dave S

    20 Jan 2019 San Diego, California USA

    If you take a look back over the past 30 years or so, you will notice that Apple (and others) stop support for a product on its 7th anniversary. Not because they have to, but because that is the minimum that US law says they must support a product.

  8. Julia T

    20 Jan 2019 Sandy Hook, Connecticut

    I'd still be happily using Snow Leopard if I hadn't been forced to upgrade for app compatibility. As far as I can see, nothing useful has been added since, apart from the TouchBar.

  9. Tim J

    20 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Dehydrating in AZ

    From a low-level driver and kernel level, 10.4.11 was the most stable and useful version of OS X that Apple ever produced. It was still a real OS and not an OS on it's way to tablets-villa. Heck, you could still get the REAL server version of 10.4.

  10. Sam R

    20 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Hengchun, Pingtung, Taiwan

    @Tim J From a low-level driver and kernel level, 10.4.11 was the most stable and useful version of OS X that Apple ever produced. It was still a real OS and not an OS on it's way to tablets-villa. Heck, you could still get the REAL server version of 10.4.

    I think the major problem here is that people are not excited enough to buy new Macs; is this a hardware issue, a software issue, or is it both?

  11. Jeff T

    20 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers Midlands of England, Europe
    Edited 6 months ago

    that is the minimum that US law says they must support a product.

    Thats interesting. never heard of this legislation - who else does it affect?
    Most phones stop getting updates in 5 years or much less in the case of Android machines.

  12. Jean-Yves P

    20 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Europe (France, Besançon)
    Edited 6 months ago

    the last time I was excited about a new product was ... for the iPhone more than 10 years ago (wasn't it 2007 ?)
    that was a real revolution.
    since then some evolutions on a product line but nothing exciting at all.
    forgot: Siri was a real software revolution at its time, now it's quite outdated.

  13. Tim J

    21 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Dehydrating in AZ

    @Sam R I think the major problem here is that people are not excited enough to buy new Macs

    Apple is often bitten by the "if it works, don't fix it" end user attitude. This is very obvious in the current fall off in iPhone sales. And, I'm seeing more and more Surface Pro tablets and Samsung Galaxy phones show up in TV shows that were almost always iPads and iPhones before.

    After watching Tim cook's Apple slide from on high for the past 7 years, it's going to take some serious innovation to stop them from becoming another Asus or Lenovo where price is the reason for purchase rather than function, design, or purpose. They lost their hold on schools, canceled their Enterprise efforts, and allowed pro-grade hardware to languish for 5 years. That's not a company in a leadership position on the personal computing front. Combine that with the ability to build a $300 Hackintosh that far outperforms Apple's $999 Mac Mini and it's not going to be long before we see the Mac platform relegated to the worlds of AtariST and Amiga.

  14. @Jean-YvesPochez the last time I was excited about a new product was ... for the iPhone more than 10 years ago (wasn't it 2007 ?

    At a business event of our company, a supervisor talked about changes in our company within the next ten years, both inside and in contact with customers. He drew a comparison with the iPhone. Which iPhone was there ten years ago? - Long break - "None at all" the dork told us - if he had told it properly, I would not call him a dork. But please make sure that the event is over soon.

  15. Tim S

    21 Jan 2019 Canterbury, UK

    @Sam R I think the major problem here is that people are not excited enough to buy new Macs; is this a hardware issue, a software issue, or is it both?

    This is a late 2012 Mini with 10Gig and a reasonably-sized SSD in addition to the internal drive. Why would I need to change it? Where's my motivation? It has the mobo connectors so a second drive could be added, likewise the memory was upgraded when I got it off eBay.

    I've not tried Mojave on it yet but assume it will run.

  16. Beatrix W

    21 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers Europe (Germany)

    Today I did the first full build of both versions of my app: a couple of helper apps + main app, 2 times for 2 versions. dmgs also created. Thanks to the IDE communicator the manual effort is minimal. But - man - this takes soooo long. I got an i7 iMac but I want a faster computer.

  17. Dave S

    21 Jan 2019 San Diego, California USA

    @Beatrix W I got an i7 iMac but I want a faster computer.

    I think for the most part "computer speed" is a preception. I'll bet (certain processes not withstanding) that when you got that i7 iMac,it was "WOW! this is fast" (I know that is how I reacted)... yet today (a mere 9 months later). Is is more like "yeah , it runs ok"

    I remember back when I bought my 2nd computer... it had a clock speed 2x that of the first one.... and it was BLAZING!
    Today I'd fall asleep waiting for that one to actually do something (FYI.... it was a 4mhz Z80.... yes MEGAHERTZ, NOT GIGHERTZ, meaning "techincally" my iMac is 1000x faster...in reality its more).... The problem is that 1000x more speed has to do 500x more work

  18. Tim J

    21 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Dehydrating in AZ

    I think back to the work that I got done on a 286 system running SCO XENIX with X11 or a Sun 3/60 ... When we got our first 386, it was like someone had given us leisure time in a box - it was 3x faster at compiling than the 286, so BRU only took 3-1/2 hours instead of overnight.

    But when we speak of these performance increments, we're talking about "leaps" in processing performance, not bundling new versions of iTunes, iMessage, Photos, and Mail and calling it a new OS.

    WRT to BRU and performance on modern systems, from aclocal to test run, a current BRU build takes around 45 seconds under Linux, FreeBSD, or macOS and we get more impatient than ever :S

  19. Emile S

    21 Jan 2019 Europe (France, Strasbourg)

    The name of the game is… adaptation.

    A fast computer (as run for the first time) is nearly as fast as it will be six month later, but the user adapt its perception and six month later that computer does not seems to be as fast as the first time you ran it…

    Here I do not take into account any OS (version *) change(s), applications updates/upgrades, …

    * Usually, a new OS version is always slower than the previous version. I only saw once an exception to this rule: GS/OS 5 (yes, the Apple IIgs OS, back in 1989…).

  20. Sam R

    21 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Hengchun, Pingtung, Taiwan

    @Tim S This is a late 2012 Mini with 10Gig and a reasonably-sized SSD in addition to the internal drive. Why would I need to change it? Where's my motivation? It has the mobo connectors so a second drive could be added, likewise the memory was upgraded when I got it off eBay.

    That is the point I'm making. There is obviously nothing in Apple's line up that makes you want to upgrade. This is a problem for Apple.

    @Emile S * Usually, a new OS version is always slower than the previous version. I only saw once an exception to this rule: GS/OS 5 (yes, the Apple IIgs OS, back in 1989…).

    Yes this is the rule of thumb, logically as the OS gets more features it becomes bigger.

  21. Jeff T

    21 Jan 2019 Pre-Release Testers Midlands of England, Europe

    There is obviously nothing in Apple's line up that makes you want to upgrade.

    +1
    Sad but true.

    I want a new MacBook with retina, and a decent range of slots.. 2 USB3, an SD Slot, normal Ethernet, HDMI, and some USB C
    So that I can walk into a meeting anywhere with some hope of being able to use my machine with 'their' kit.
    (If Im paying thousands for a machine, I object to having to pay hundreds more to use it with other hardware.)
    SSD drives are inexpensive now.
    So I don't want to see any 128Gb crippled machines, with a 500Gb option costing hundreds more.
    Start with 500Gb, why not - Windows spec machines ship with 1Tb and cost less.
    I want a keyboard where the keys won't stick or drop off.
    And if Im being honest, I don't care if it's unibody. I'd rather have a thicker model that comes apart so that I can upgrade the drive or the memory.

    Do that, and my money is waiting.
    The only reason I havent yet bought one of the Windows look-alikes is that it's easier to run MacOs on the real thing.

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