UI Design: Can I use a Declare to alter the colour/strength of a Group Box Border?

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  2. 4 months ago

    Steve K

    Jan 10 Melbourne, Australia

    @Julia T Regardless of UI quirks, it's a pretty awesome cool app :)

    Thanks Julia. Perhaps "Quirks" is a very nice way of saying non-standard :), and I thank you for appreciating the point, and being positive.

    Standards/rules are there to be broken. Creating a software application that's "easy" to use, is much harder than making it "hard" to use, but easier for the developer.

    For example, with my App, there is no SAVE AS. It all works fine in the "context" of "MY" application. "quirky/non-standard" DOES NOT = WRONG!.

    And besides, Xojo let me do it :)

  3. Don L

    Jan 10 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Florence, South Carolina USA

    @SteveKelepouris Standards/rules are there to be broken.

    I'm not sure I'd go that far, but I will say I've lost track of the number of times I've had a client request I do something to a UI that IS "non-standard" because they feel it is easier for them to understand and use.

  4. Alfred V

    Jan 10 Pre-Release Testers

    @Thomas E Just a note (because I got burning eyes caused of that):
    Temperature must be "°C" and not "C".
    The weight is "metric weight unit" ( I had to search for it). The SI unit symbol is just "g" (see Wikipedia Gram .

    Glad that you use metric units as the rest of the sane world it would be nice toe see the correct units ;)

    No the temperature must be expressed as "C" and "C" is spelled out as degrees celsius. In the scientific world where papers are submitted to peer reviewed journals, degrees Kelvin is K, degrees Fahrenheit is "F". The sign of degree ° is reserved for angle.

  5. Steve K

    Jan 10 Melbourne, Australia
    Edited 4 months ago

    gm may not be the official notation, but according to the encyclopedia britannica:

    The official International System of Units abbreviation is g, but gm has also been used.

    Thanks Alfred, looks like just "C" is correct. I'll remove the ° symbol. I didn't like the look of it anyway.

    Cheers.

  6. Derk J

    Jan 10 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro

    The SI-Unit of “gram” should be “g” as “gm” means “gram-metre” you might not wanna use “gm”.

  7. Robin L

    Jan 11 Xojo Inc Europe (Germany, Rehlingen)

    Shouldn't it be 'Gross Mass' instead of 'Gross Weight'?

  8. Steve K

    Jan 11 Melbourne, Australia

    @Robin L-Mitchell Shouldn't it be 'Gross Mass' instead of 'Gross Weight'?

    According to google:

    There is a basic difference, because mass is the actual amount of material contained in a body and is measured in kg, gm, etc. Whereas weight is the force exerted by the gravity on that object mg. Note that mass is independent of everything but weight is different on the earth, moon, etc.

    In my case, the user must weigh the various components (on earth) using a weighing scale. The total weight of each components is the Gross Weight. I suppose in space you would use mass instead. Technically mass, but most people are more familiar with weight.

    Interestingly in the example above, gm is used for gram.

    This is the final altitude prediction equation:

    -image-
    (from G. Harry Stine - Handbook Of Model Rocketry)

    Weight (W) is used in the above equation. Also you can see that "gravity" is expressed as "g" - that's why I'm using gm for grams. I believe it's acceptable. It's not exactly rocket science :)

    Now for something amusing. This extract makes me giggle :) (taken from the same page):
    -image-

  9. Beatrix W

    Jan 11 Pre-Release Testers Europe (Germany)

    @SteveKelepouris : thanks for that giggle. Needed it today. Is this from the fifties?

  10. Steve K

    Jan 11 Melbourne, Australia
    Edited 4 months ago

    @Beatrix W @SteveKelepouris : thanks for that giggle. Needed it today. Is this from the fifties?

    The book was first published in 1965. I don't have the entire book, just a photocopy of the chapter regarding altitude calculations. Photocopied from a library book in the early eighties. This was before I purchased my first PC (IBM/XT). Before that I had a programmable calculator - a real pain.

    The book is regarded as the bible of model rocketry and the official handbook of the National Association of Rocketry (US).

  11. Thomas E

    Jan 14 Pre-Release Testers

    @Alfred V;Hoek No the temperature must be expressed as "C" and "C" is spelled out as degrees celsius. In the scientific world where papers are submitted to peer reviewed journals, degrees Kelvin is K, degrees Fahrenheit is "F". The sign of degree ° is reserved for angle.

    This is just wrong.
    Celsius and Fahrenheit are degree units. These have always the sign of degree. See wikipedia Celsius , wikipedia Fahrenheit .
    Kelvin is a SI base unit an and you write never a degree sign with Kelvin (wikipedia Kelvin )!

  12. Steve K

    Jan 17 Melbourne, Australia
    Edited 4 months ago

    @Thomas E This is just wrong.
    Celsius and Fahrenheit are degree units. These have always the sign of degree. See wikipedia Celsius , wikipedia Fahrenheit .
    Kelvin is a SI base unit an and you write never a degree sign with Kelvin (wikipedia Kelvin )!

    Yep. Righto. I wouldn't go as far to say it's "wrong", but I accept it, and have changed it back to include the degrees symbol.

    The reason I've done so is because, yes, I agree that it IS actually the correct way to show it. Thankyou. That's not to say that just using C/F/K to describe degrees is unclear, but in this case, there is no reason NOT to be correct, and there are no real ramifications either way.

    This is what I've ended up with:
    -image-

    Now, before anyone questions why the degrees symbols, ie. Degrees of Temperature and Degrees of Angle don't look the same, well, I'll give you the mail: It's purely an aesthetic choice.

    It does however make me think about degrees. Why the Heck do we have degrees, using the same symbol for heat or an angle? Is there a relationship that I don't understand?

    I only went as far as Year 11 Physics, which I failed.

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