XML and VCP Project Files

If someone is dead-set on pirating, they are going to do it. But licensing like this stops the casual pirate. I’m not willing to bet my livelihood and that of the rest of my team on that people will read and adhere to the EULA.

I use 3 machines fairly often (Windows desktop, Mac desktop, Macbook) and I would naturally expect to be able to build on whichever one I happen to be using at the moment. (Surely 3 computers is not an unusual number for a professional developer to have.) As I understand it, every time I pick up my Macbook and go somewhere with it, and try to build a Xojo project, it’s going to de-link both of my desktop machines? That seems like a major pain. Then when I get home I have to re-link my desktops, and that de-links my Macbook?

How onerous/time-consuming is this de-linking/re-linking? If it happens automatically and takes like 20 seconds, I guess that might not be too bad. But frankly it sounds like a nightmare.

Is it as god-awful as I’m imagining? If it is, can we noodle on some kind of solution? (E.g, I suppose I’d be willing to pay some amount to authorize 1 or 2 additional build machines – not purchasing a whole set of additional licenses, something less than that.)

[quote=964:@Walter Purvis]How onerous/time-consuming is this de-linking/re-linking? If it happens automatically and takes like 20 seconds, I guess that might not be too bad. But frankly it sounds like a nightmare.
[/quote]

[quote=964:@Walter Purvis]Is it as god-awful as I’m imagining? If it is, can we noodle on some kind of solution? (E.g, I suppose I’d be willing to pay some amount to authorize 1 or 2 additional build machines – not purchasing a whole set of additional licenses, something less than that.)
[/quote]

Walter, I don’t think it’s all that bad. But give it a try and if see what you think. If it’s too problematic, I think we can work something out for you.

I like the Adobe Creative Cloud method - You connect to their servers when you start using a new computer and the other computers are “disconnected”. When you go back to one of the original computers, you’re prompted to login again and you keep working with only the slight side trip of logging into their servers again on the original system.

I believe that the Xojo license will be something like that, but I haven’t had a chance to try on more than my main system yet.

How do virtual machines fit here. I develop in OSX on a desktop and laptop, but I also test and tune the interface in Windows on both machines (using Parallels).

< Scott >

[quote=992:@Scott Baker]How do virtual machines fit here. I develop in OSX on a desktop and laptop, but I also test and tune the interface in Windows on both machines (using Parallels).
< Scott >[/quote]
I believe we see VMs as separate devices but I’m not 100% certain on that one.

I didn’t think about it until now but I have a laptop and desktop both running parallels. Seems I won’t be able to have a Windows and Mac version on both.

That brings up some questions. Not counting Macs which I have not officially support up to this point, I have tested in the past on XP, Vista, Win 7, and soon to be Win 8. While I develop mostly on Windows 7, the other environments I don’t keep physcial machines around, I have VMs in Parallels on my Mac that I test the alternate Win environments. Each VM, in essence, constitutes half a license? If so, how many decades am I allowed to extend my current license agreement? :wink:

p.s. X P = mad face, that’s cute, but about 30% of personal computers in use today are still on XP, still have to test on it no matter what our personal thoughs are on the subject.

I use remote debugging on my wifes Mac from my Windows machine. Works well for me (I use RealVNC to remote control it from my office). Also because I use external items to share code between projects it’s a PITA to make these available cross platform or even cross machines.

With the new licensing I’ll be able to give a copy to my graphics people to create Web styles which I can then incorporate into my projects. They’ll never build an app so won’t need a license.

I see these moves as a relaxation on the restrictions I’ve had to work with.

Don’t forget that the licenses control building only. You can install the IDE on all the computers and VMs you want and run your project. So in terms of testing, our new licensing policy is a significant improvement.

I do exactly that, with SmartGit and Arbed, for years. Works for me better than with the wonky VCP format, because I can still use external classes that are shared between multiple projects, too.

Here’s a description of how it works: http://www.tempel.org/Arbed/SmartGit

Right, but you can’t diff the files and see what you have changed with the binary format. And if you can’t diff (and therefore merge), it is really just a glorified backup solution and not really version control. The VCP format has been pretty workable other than re-ordering things, once things settle down, I’ll pursue that a little harder through feedback.

Are you replying to me?
Because you make no sense. What gives you the idea that you cannot diff the rbp files with Arbed? I expressly wrote that Arbed can do that in conjunction with flexible Version Control software (e.g. SmartGit, SourceTree, and Tower). For years now.

But if my understanding is right, doing this will not have support for VCP or XML formats, so that is not really useful to me as a developer. We really need all file formats available on all versions.

Well, that’s not going to happen. I’m just being honest and setting your expectations.

[quote=1086:@Thomas Tempelmann]Are you replying to me?
Because you make no sense. What gives you the idea that you cannot diff the rbp files with Arbed? I expressly wrote that Arbed can do that in conjunction with flexible Version Control software (e.g. SmartGit, SourceTree, and Tower). For years now.[/quote]
Pardon, I was making the comment about the RBP files used directly in conjunction with version control, which can’t diff proprietary binary files they don’t understand. I was not speaking about Arbed and was not aware that it could be used in conjunction with version control systems. Does it work with Mercurial, in particularly TortoiseHg?

So I can have IDE on multiple computers for development/debugging purposes (ie: cmd-R Run in RealStudio now). It’s just the cmd-B Build that I need the license for, correct?

As Arbed is used as an external diff tool, ie. for viewing the project differences, it should work with Hg just as well as with git. It rather depends on the git/Hg tool: Does it support using external diff viewers? SourceTree, which supports Hg, does. I don’t know about TortoiseHg, sorry.

That’s correct.

I mainly work on one MacBookPro, I have second one as backup and sometimes I work on a iMac in the Office.
On the MacBookPro I have various VMWare machines. On a Windows 7 vm I have also the Windows IDE installed and I build there for Windows, because I have noticed, that I am not getting the same results when building on OSX for Windows. In short: a windows build from OSX crashes, the one built on Windows does not.

And then I have a Ubuntu 12.10 vm as well, plus various server OS…

I believe, that the limitation to 2 build machines will not work well for me. For me 3 would be good. But hey - somehow I will adapt to this new situation.

I understand the point of view of Xojo Corp. - you must put limits, otherwise the Ferengi out there will just laugh at you …