Why no TextColor property for all controls?

For example CheckBoxes or RadioButtons know only one text color: black.

I would seem an easy feature to add, and there ARE old feature requests for it languishing in the feedback database … but why has it not been implemented in the first place? Any reason anything can think of?

(and yes, I know I can work around it with a label, I just wonder why that is necessary …)

Not in use in macOS ?
(Against HIG ?)

This is a feature request since the RealBasic days. It can makes Xojo user interfaces ugly. I use other environments where you have text and background colors for all controls and objects.

As you mentioned already, you can workaround it perfectly, even with a canvas and a painting program like Affinity designer. It will give your user interface a much more personal look and feel. Maybe it is not so bad that for many controls there is no textcolor property. There was a time I missed that but no longer.

Long ago Xojo explained the reason, had something to do with cross platform and using native controls. I cannot remember the explanation completely, but I agreed with it. For me, it was never a showstopper.

I’m agree, but I hope it’s not the reason why TextColor property is not present in all controls. Developers are free to make an ugly application as their customers are free to ask a ugly UI.

I look for this function one time, I added a hide control in my app. An example where it can be useful.

Canvas is not theme-savvy, so Label is a better work-around.

@Markus Winter
You mean something like StyleSheets in Qt, where you can use css for Controls ?
That would be nice in Xojo.

an example from PyQt5

def stylesheet(self): return """ QPlainTextEdit { background: #ECECEC; color: #202020; border: 1px solid #1EAE3D; selection-background-color: #505050; selection-color: #ACDED5; } """

[quote=365799:@Emile Schwarz]Not in use in macOS ?
(Against HIG ?)[/quote]

HIG = guidelines… not “THE LAW”

and if you think this is a failing for Desktop… try counting the visual attributes that “Xojo for iOS” is missing

HIG for Mac or Design Guidelines for Windows are just guidelines intended to help developers create apps that can be used intuitively.

Sure, any developer can do whatever he pleases, and that includes very unusual stuff. The problem is that then, it will be very difficult to use for your average Joe.

Sure, there are quasi religious conceptions amongst developers, those who hate Windows design guidelines being an evident example.

Note that the best example of standardization of the UI most of us use everyday : cars. Just imagine if pedals were not standardized. Lucky for us, car development is not so much governed by whims anymore.

Too bad the English don’t follow American Vehicle Guidelines … they put the steering wheel on wrong side!!!

(tongue in cheek)

[quote=365841:@Dave S]Too bad the English don’t follow American Vehicle Guidelines … they put the steering wheel on wrong side!!!
(tongue in cheek)[/quote]

So do about one third of the countries in the world! (Including Japan, India and many African countries. Sweden too, until some time in the 1960s, I think.) After 30+ years living in Spain I can barely cope with driving when I go to the UK. I keep sticking my hand out of the window when I want to change gear…

I can’t actually think of a good reason why they wouldn’t have a standard set of properties they apply to a control and remove/limit them depending on what the control can/can’t do.

I can only assume that it’s because Xojo like to tease?

Its actually a massive determent to their platform.

Developer A wants to create a cross platform semi-custom UI for their app, eg. a dark theme, they want to use the controls included with the development environment to save development time and money.

They look at a few different apps (I won’t name them) including Xojo.

Xojo does what they want but they need to do some cross platform coding / canvas painting to get a radio or checkbox with inverted text to sit on their dark themed app.

Other App does what they want out of the box and they don’t need to do any additional UI coding.

Which one would you pick?

Perhaps it is under the control of the OS and NOT of Xojo… since Xojo attempts to use Native controls where possible

Xojo does use native controls, but often does not expose all properties. Noticeably alpha in background color.

Hence the frequent need for declares.

[quote=365865:@Michel Bujardet]Xojo does use native controls, but often does not expose all properties. Noticeably alpha in background color.

Hence the frequent need for declares.[/quote]
LOL… kinda sounds like “Xojo for iOS” :slight_smile:

Alpha in background color I can understand because that can be a pain to make cross platform in windows (might be easier with the windows update coming).

But leaving properties off iOS seems odd when it wasn’t cross platform when it was first introduced, do they really? (I’ve not played with Xojo iOS yet).

If they do, do you think its a time constraint thing to get the stuff out the door or something else?

[quote=365870:@JulianS]But leaving properties off iOS seems odd when it wasn’t cross platform when it was first introduced, do they really? (I’ve not played with Xojo iOS yet).

If they do, do you think its a time constraint thing to get the stuff out the door or something else?[/quote]
Yes, really they did… and simple things like colors… more advanced properties such as background images (as opposed to solid colors, I can kind of understand from a time constraint… but not the “simple” stuff)

and how many years has “Xojo for iOS” been available?

I hears yas, makes me :frowning:

Don’t get me started on Xojo iOS… Not only did they make it terribly limited and hid so many properties to the point of toyishness, but since late 2014, they never seemed to find one minute for elementary feature requests, like exposing properties.

I don’t think it is a time constraint so much, as utter contempt for that platform. When you think the market for iOS is about 25 times that of macOS at the minimum, it leaves one wondering about Xojo’s ability to survive in the future mobile intensive computing world.

If they do the same for Android, it will definitely start questioning the sanity of whomever is in charge of insuring development.

I assume you do not mean “iOS” but more accuratly “Xojo for iOS”

Right. I corrected my post. iOS is fine. Xojo iOS is anything but.