What does the new Mac Pro say about the future of macOS?

My apologies if anyone has already speculated on this topic, but it only just occurred to me now.

When I think about what an apparently astonishing piece of hardware the new Mac Pro is (or at least the price is astonishing), and consider what many here (and other places) have said about how more-and-more powerless and/or frustrated developers are becoming with each new macOS release (and new features like Marzipan) - what does it say about Apple’s intentions of the OS, and their investment and promotion of the Mac Pro?

I could be (and likely am) way off base, but it kind of seems to me like one of those left-hand-not-talking-to-the-right-hand situations, where the two things, i.e., the OS and the Pro hardware just don’t quite jive.

Could it be that Apple is setting themselves up to split macOS into a “lite” version and a “pro” version?

Maybe something not unlike MS Windows, where they have (or tried) versions like RT (which only allowed apps from their Store), Starter, Home, etc… (ad supported versions)… up to Professional and Enterprise.

That’s just plain crazy talk, right?

The come back of the Pro OS at Apple ?

Get ready to add a Pro (prefix or suffix) to your applications names…

[quote=468540:@Scott Cadillac]Could it be that Apple is setting themselves up to split macOS into a “lite” version and a “pro” version?

Maybe something not unlike MS Windows, where they have (or tried) versions like RT (which only allowed apps from their Store), Starter, Home, etc… (ad supported versions)… up to Professional and Enterprise.[/quote]

I am not sure we will ever see a “lite” Mac the like of Windows RT. It was a dismal failure and only Surface Pro which is a full fledged PC saved the day.

What Marzipan says, though, and what the incremental move toward the same underlying system calls say, is that macOS is more and more a desktop version of iOS.

iOS represents today something like 45% of the US mobile market. There are 14 Billion Apple device users, of which 100 million only are Mac users. See https://expandedramblings.com/index.php/by-the-numbers-amazing-apple-stats/.

It would make sense for Apple to focus on primarily on iOS, and to consider Mac as a spin off. Or when it comes to development platform, a tool primarily centered on iOS.

I don’t know about you, but sales in the MAS are but a third of what they were back in 2013. When iOS keeps gobbling more and more apps.

The writing is on the wall.

What it does imply is that Intel will not be replaced for something else any time soon for macOS. I cannot imagine Apple now releasing their flagship with Intel-inside stuff and replace it in the near future for Intel-outside stuff.
If they do this, they will for sure upset pro users (again).

BTW I truly hope we never ever see a non-Intel macOS system.

Apple seems slowly fusing their OS’s in a one core only, with special tailored designs of UI’s for each one. That’s the inverse of splitting it into diverse incompatible OS’s. With a high level language taking care of it, switching from X86 to ARM and back , will not be a hard job.

You omitted a decimal point there.

That history is interesting and the stats are pretty amazing. (The market cap is $1.3T now!)

I should have copied from the article. But it is also why I always mention my sources:

Number of active device users
14 Billion

Beyond decimal points, Apple is decidedly a company like no other.

[quote=468801:@Michel Bujardet]I should have copied from the article. But it is also why I always mention my sources:

Number of active device users
14 Billion
[/quote]

Why did you substitute active for Apple? (And bold and italicize it no less.)

If you wanted to copy exactly what the article says, it would include both active and Apple.

And a decimal point.

[quote]Number of Active Apple Device Users:

1.4 billion[/quote]

I think it interesting that some people critizie Apple for attempting to create a single code base for all their operating systems. When Xojo is being “praised” for doing exactly that.

Having a single framework for common items is a “good” thing as it allows the vendor (Apple or Xojo) to concentrate on functionality and not have to duplicate efforts for each platform (and remember Apple has FOUR (macOS, iOS, Watch and Apple TV (with the last 3 already sharing a great deal)).

This way each platform can have its GUI level which calls a common logic level. And done properly even the GUI code can be done very much the same, with the layer abstracted to provide the OS/Device specific requirements

RIght now iOS has controls/classes that are named UIxxx and macOS has very similar ones named NSxxx
when it could boils down to UXxxx and Xcode deals with the internal requirements of each similar to #IF Target

I often hear about what a good investment Apple stock has been. However, I checked my portfolio yesterday and found that I have a small lot that I purchased 11 years ago (12/22/2008) for $1,075. If I sold it now, I estimate that I would owe around $3,360 in taxes (U.S. Federal income tax/ long-term capital gains). Horrifying that I’d owe in taxes an amount 3.3 times the original investment!

Struggling with the math here.

Since 2008, Apple stock has increase 623%… so if you bough $1075 worth, it is now worth $6700
and you are suggesting you are in 50% tax bracket??? or more like 60% since the original $1075 doesn’t count

But that not withstanding, you still doubled your money.

More than the math is suspect. Capital gains in the US maxes out at 20% regardless of what tax bracket you are in.

I bought my original shares back in the late 90s when the analysts were insisting Apple was going out of business. I’ll be very happy to pay my capital gains when that day comes!

Steve

Dave,
This was meant to be a bit tongue in cheek… the bottom line is that Apple growth has been amazing.

The math: I bought 12 shares at $89.60 per share 11 years ago (almost to the day) for $1,075.20. At some point, they split the stock 7:1, giving me 84 shares today in that lot. The stock price closed at $279.44 yesterday, so the value of the stock is 84 * $279.44 = $23,472.96. The taxable gain from a sale would be 23,472.92 - 1,075.20 = $ 22,397.76. Federal income tax on a long-term capital gain of $22,397.76 at the 15% rate would be: $3,359.66. Hardy seems fair that the tax is over three times my investment???

So I didn’t double my money… it actually grew around 20-fold (after tax). I often suspect “off by one” errors with aapl stock (ie. off by one order of magnitude).

[quote=468803:@Walter Purvis]Why did you substitute active for Apple? (And bold and italicize it no less.)

If you wanted to copy exactly what the article says, it would include both active and Apple.

And a decimal point.[/quote]

Sorry. My mistake.

Nevertheless, the contrast between Mac and iOS devices is so intense, Mac is more and more nothing less than an accessory.

Depends on your PoV, I suppose. I struggle to find a use for my iPhone. We only got them because we thought that SWMBO was going to be much more involved in something than eventually turned out to be the case. I no longer pick up mail on it because it’s not secure, and I stopped using Twitter on it. WhatsApp? Well I can do without that too. I’d be happy to go back to the £30 clamshell I was using before. And it has a much better battery life.

So for me, the Mac is what I use and everything else is just a toy.

Could be generational. I was one of the first to have an Apple IIe at home back in 1982, so to me the keyboard is second nature. I have an iPhone in my pocket more for the love of technology than for the use of apps.

My son is 42, and kinda born with computers. His favorite tool is an iPhone 10, plus some Android ones (I lost count), and a Surface Pro tablet. He almost never uses the Surface but to backup his phones. But he does everything on the iPhone, including writing letters he then prints on a Wifi printer.

I am not especially advocating mobile. I am just noticing a trend. Not based solely on my son. Already over 50% of buyers on Amazon use mobile.

It was in 1965 that I learnt that you can’t (or, at any rate, shouldn’t) compare floats for equality - writing a small program to calculate square roots by Newton’s method. So although I wasn’t born with them, I started doing stuff with computers as soon as I reasonably could - at Uni. And have been writing software ever since.

But to me, too much of this more recent stuff looks like solutions looking for a problem - Apple Watch, Alexa, and so on. And yet people buy it. Bizarre.

The iPhone screen is just too small to do any serious work on.

I could not program on an iPhone today. Perhaps because my eyesight is not what it used to be. Yet, in the seventies, lots of us wrote programs for the HP calculators.

I definitely belong to my era, and probably won’t change now.

But I do know the younger generation appreciate their tiny mobile computers. I even have an Amazon Echo at home, and use it to get PBS stations or listen to smooth jazz.

These HP calculators were quasi indestructible. I remember dropping mine (an HP21) in the stairs. It went tumbling a whole flight of terrazo stairs. When I pcked it up, it was working as if nothing happened. Try that with a IPhone or a Pixel today, even with an otterbox case! I also liked programming my TI 59 calculator. The magnetic strip was so cool! I could load programs as needed. Very useful in physics exams when calculators were allowed.

I am in the same group as Michel. I don’t do much with my Pixel today except use it as a phone (it does do that, too!) and consume some services such as SMS and email. One or two time wasters (games) too. Anything meaningful is done on a computer.

I’m 47 and my iPhone is indispensable to me.

Surfing the web, collecting email (16 accounts with the excellent Spark Mail), Twitter, Messages, Facebook (both personal and managing my business pages) and many many more apps.

The screen is the perfect size for me (iPhone 10s) and I have my business in my pocket wherever I go.

I find it a great device to consume content on and whilst content creation is best done on a larger device for most things there are some things that you can do just fine on a phone.