Using Cloud Storage with Xojo - Do You Do it?

I’ve tested this with Google Drive using their Google Drive Desktop App. It seems to work fine as long as I allow it to synch changes. My goal is to easily move between laptop and main system for Xojo projects without always copying things back and forth. It’s quite nice just writing/reading directly to/from the google drive from within Xojo.

Now before getting all concerned about security and such, I would back up all my stuff and never put anything with info or code with sensitive info that I’m concerned with loss or unauthorized access.

Aside from what I mention above, I’d like to hear feedback from those that have actually at least tried this or doing it with Google Drive.

Personally, I’d rather setup a nice Personal Cloud Drive at home, but I need the same features I’m getting with Google Drive.

Thoughts?

Use GIT, really good for syncing projects between devices.

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On you debug destination setting, under the shared build settings, I would set it to a location that is not on your cloud drive. I have some projects on my OneDrive and I had issues with it trying to sync during debug builds. Once I set the location to a place that is not on Onedrive, the issues went away.

I haven’t used them before. Do you know how much space you get and can you access as I mentioned?

I didn’t do this for my test and it seemed to work fine.

Currently, I’m looking for free with no monthly costs. Also, a look at Github, their free version is only 500mb where Google Drive gives me 15 Gig at no cost. No contest for me if I’m putting and storing stuff out there.

You can only store source code (and other project related information) in GitHub so the space isn’t that limiting.

Understood…but that defeats the purpose of what I’m trying to do. Thanks for the suggestion though.

If you have a NAS system running at home, e.g. a Synology, you can easily set up a local Git Server on it and host your own git instance.
A nice git client like Fork makes it simple to use.

And Xojo has no issue opening and saving to it directly? If I have to do any file copying and managing outside of Xojo for the projects, I’ll just copy the files and keep it simple.

I used to store all my Xojo projects on Google Drive.
But using Git made it easier to handle commits and versionning.

Nowadays I store source code on github and document related files on Google Drive.
I find it easier that way, having access to documents directly on my phone with Google drive, and source code on my Mac with a git client.

Xojo is storing its projects on the local disk. A git client, like Fork, is used to sync the project folder…

It seems to be working fine working with the source code, making a change and then continuing work on the other system. I have noticed some issues if I build on one system and try to run that build on the other system I get strange errors about signing. But, if I build on either system and run the build on that system it’s fine. I’m going to keep testing and see what happens.

I do appreciate all the suggestions posted so far. I’m trying to keep it as simple and and uncomplicated as possible which is why I want to deal with it only on Google Drive, or a Cloud Drive if something else found is better. Adding other systems and processes just defeats the purpose, at least for what I need.

So each system setup would get synched to Git and the local files would be the same on each system after they sync?

I resisted a source code control system for a long time, until I realized that a) I had essentially created my own with dealing with synching between systems, and b) once I started using a real system, it was so much easier. It does change your work flow, I think for the better. You start to focus on smaller localized changes that you then commit and add a comment about what you did and why. Those comments become very valuable over time. Please consider using GIT or SVN. They even work with binary project formats, with the comments being most significant. (There are tools available to compare binary projects, it’s just not as integrated into the source code system.)

Unfortunately it’ll work right up to the point when it doesn’t. Many, many users have gone down this path and later come back with complaints about project corruption.

Consider yourself warned.

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That is exactly why I asked the question. I will take your advice and avoid doing it. I’ll just move my projects between my laptop and main system as needed.

Sooner or later GIT/SVN will save your behind. Whenever you screw up you can easily restore from version control. Even if you don’t use more advanced features like branching version control is much better than copying projects between computers. If you don’t want to use text format then xml with external object works perfectly fine, too.

Really, just use git. It’ll take a little getting used to, but it’s perfect for this. I do some work on my laptop, commit changes, pull on my pc, do some more work, and so on. It keeps everything in sync, and like has been mentioned, it’s permanent backup too. Made some changes and realize that was a bad idea or it just doesn’t work? Discard the changes or revert the commit. Need to see what your project looked like in the past? Git has it. You can keep your images in your repository too, they just don’t version as well.

Browse through GitHub - thommcgrath/Beacon: An editor for the Beacons in Ark: Survival Evolved if you want to see a real shipping app in git.