SSD just crashed - is this a one time thing?

I have an iMac Retina late 2014 with an Apple SSD. I just installed a ram upgrade of OWC and within a few days my SSD crashes and is so corrupted that Disk Utility or fsck can’t repair it. I decided to just reformat the SSD and restore the backup.

I checked the RAM with rember and it all checks out OK.

The computer is connected to a UPS.

The computer is still under it’s first year warranty, however, now that I have reformatted the SSD, all is working again. Is this a fluke? How likely is this apt to happen again?

Typically, if a SSD is damaged, you won’t be able to reformat it, or do anything at all with it. How did you check the RAM?

I would submit the ram to a torture test with a utility. On a mac, the Apple Hardware Test Suite is said to be the tool of choice. On the PC, I like memtest86.

If the SSD was seriously damaged, you usually could not reformat it. I had an old Vertex 2 do funny things for a while before it died for good but that is not the way SSD’s normally die. They usually just stop and never wake up again.

SSDs seem to be kind of flaky in some circumstances. early january I fitted my PC with a Sandisk SSD and twice it did what you describe : lose its marbles so bad I had to restore it from a backup.

I ended up sending back the mess to Amazon. In Windows, it does not make too much of a difference in performances, but on Mac, it brings a dramatic improvement. I never observed any issue with the Thunderbolt Transcend I have been using since October on my 2011 iMac, though.

I still don’t trust SSD. I make sure to clone to the internal hard disk. So in case the SSD goes coocoo, I will be able to use right away my much slower, good old reliable Macintosh HD.

memtest is the recommended tool on the Mac too.

http://www.memtestosx.org

Last month had also a SSD crash (PC) and our company tech guy said I should just put in a new one. When I asked him if I could reformat the old one and maybe use it in a bay as an external disk he laught and pointed to the bin: ‘that is its place’, he said.

Apparently, there is a price for having a blistering fast disk. He also told me, as an SSD has only so many read/writes, they have a smart system to avoid writing to much on the same place. However, for this to work, you should only use 80% max out of the disk.

I beg to differ. It makes a huge difference on my Windows desktop, as well as on my Windows laptop. Other than the old OCZ Vertex 2 mentioned above, all my SSD’s have performed flawlessly for as long as I have had them. Even the Vertex 2 worked well for more than 2 years before going flaky. (I do expect more than 2 years out of a SSD on my laptop. With my normal work usage, a SSD should last more than 5 years)

SSD’s usually come with a utility that lets you configure it and the OS for maximum performance or maximum reliability (durability). The latter reduces the capacity somewhat, but that is my usual choice. The gain is already phenomenal over a classic hard disk.

Well. With enough RAM, Windows does not rely on the disk so much. In case of a lot of swapping, then it can benefit a lot from an SSD.

try a program called “drivedx” : http://binaryfruit.com/drivedx
it will tell you the state of health of your internal drive
it’s free for 30 days.
but a bad ram can destroy the ssd catalog, and end to something you’ve got happened.

rember is the utility of choice to test intensively the ram, make it run for 255 loops all night long, if it does not give you errors, ram is ok

I have seen 5 at most ssd with a failure, you can someone reformat them, but not for a long time
the best test is to install a mac os from scratch (internet recovery)
if the system installs itself on a fresh formatted drive, then the drive AND the ram AND the processor are good to go

BTW, I’ve seen memtest pass multiple times on what turned out to be bad RAM. Rule of thumb: if the test fails, the RAM is certainly bad, but if it passes, the RAM is probably fine.

My MBP has a Samsung 500 GB SSD for nearly 4 years now. No problems so far.
As a former electronics engineer I know how important it is to work ESD safe when you build in RAM or SSD.

as a storage professional I have to add my 2 cents worth. Spinning Media (Hard Drives, not SSDs) can slow fail and have weird stuff happen. SSDs as they are more like persistent RAM over HDs, tend to work or not work. (like @Kem Tekinay said). If you can reformat the SSD and it is working now, chances are it will work for many more years (SSDs work 4+ years on average - I have been getting 5+ on mine).

Now I would recommend to you and everyone else, please back up your system. If your HD crashes (hard crash especially), or your SSD dies, you have lost all your data. Backups can be setup fairly cheaply and it will save you a lot of hearth ache in the long run.

if anyone wants to talk about storage or backups, please feel free to hit me up.
sb

Save often, save early! (my mantra)

Don’t get me started on my backup practices. For just my iMac, I have two Time Machine backups going (one to a RAID 5), and nightly make three clones to two fixed external hard drives and one of three portable drives. One of those portable drives get rotated off-site weekly. On top of that, I sync my data to my laptop that has its own multiple backups going.

If I lose my data, we’ll all have much bigger problems.

[quote=244694:@Kem Tekinay]Don’t get me started on my backup practices. For just my iMac, I have two Time Machine backups going (one to a RAID 5), and nightly make three clones to two fixed external hard drives and one of three portable drives. One of those portable drives get rotated off-site weekly. On top of that, I sync my data to my laptop that has its own multiple backups going.

If I lose my data, we’ll all have much bigger problems.[/quote]

WOW! just WOW! that is truly backing up your data. I as a backup professional doesnt do that much protection.

I use Crashplan to backup to their cloud for everything non-O/S on the machines. Plus all my code is under git control that get replicated to some combination of BitBucket, GitHub, and Dreamhost. I do have copies of certain files on external usb drives that I keep at family member’s homes (not near my house).

I am nearly the same. But I also have an equal development machine, kept in sync, just for redundancy.
Since my house is one mile from my office, I can just ftp between 2 locations. If both burn down, I am stuck.

[quote=244703:@Joost Rongen]I am nearly the same. But I also have an equal development machine, kept in sync, just for redundancy.
Since my house is one mile from my office, I can just ftp between 2 locations. If both burn down, I am stuck.[/quote]
Maybe take a look at rsync (linux). I have many locations connected via VPN an do sync’s and backups this way. Works for Linux (of course) and Windows (via cygwin). Never had to do that for MAC but I’m sure there’s a solution, too. FTP is just too slow and dumb when handling a whole bunch of files and gigs.

rsync :stuck_out_tongue:

It’s official, I’m a MAC noob :wink:

Fingers crossed: I am using SSD for +5 years now (MBP, iMac, PC, PC laptop, …) and never had issues. Touching wood now…

True, but booting a PC with a SSD is way faster compared to a HDD. SSD < 15 seconds. HDD > 1 minute. :slight_smile: In general Windows does work a lot faster with SSD in my experience.