Need help with choosing a college course

Hey,

I do not expect anybody to have any knowledge of the coarse available at collages. But does anybody have any guesses to the difference between software development and computer science.

I have been rejected with an interview for collage. Please bare in mind this is the British collage, so this is below university level. So the US equivalent of UK collage is not US collage!! With the computer science coarse, they are looking more at Ds as a requirement, which really is not a high grade and for many people it is a piece of cake to get Ds in many subjects. But the software development coarse more Cs and at least a B in mathematics. I cannot find details of this coarse on there website, probably because it is a brand new coarse. And I have only found out about it because of the interview. They said there is a lot more coding with computer science so I am confused as to the difference. I would have thought that they would be generally the same thing and they would require the same grades but maybe I am wrong.

Thanks for your time

With all due respect: you need to take a class in English first. It’s “College” and “course”.

“Software development” is most likely “computer science” without the theoretical stuff, and with additional practical programming stuff.

[quote=62084:@Paul Rodman]With all due respect: you need to take a class in English first. It’s “College” and “course”.

“Software development” is most likely “computer science” without the theoretical stuff, and with additional practical programming stuff.[/quote]
So it is likely less written work and more programming. The man said there is a lot more coding but it is just coding really basic stuff like a web browser.

I did en engineering degree in Electronics and Communications systems but did modules is software development and computer science as part of my degree. They were obviously watered down as they were not the subject themselves and also probably biased towards communication systems but my view is that:

Software Development: Is likely to be heavily into software development, syntax, coding conventions, project management, version control etc.

Computer Science: Will probably have watered down software development, hardware, IC development, embedded and processor software, assembly language, networking, network protocols and OS architectures both high and low level.

I guess it depends on what career path you want to take but if you are looking at heading down the university route I wouldn’t worry too much at A-Level stage. Make sure you do maths, a science and physics would be good, and either software development or computer science will give you a good foundation and show your interest in the subject.

It really depends what route you want to take as to what you do.

They say the two most important life decisions you make, you need to make at a time when you are least experienced to make them…

  1. when/who to marry
  2. what career path to follow

I would highly recommend you do an aptitude test before making your career path decisions. A good aptitude test will help you a lot to make an informed decision about your career, that plays into the strengths of your talents.

Computer science might also include algorithm design and analysis, binary trees, data structures etc. I speak under correction but I think computer science is more concerned with the details of software design, while software development looks at the bigger picture of the software solution.

Mike’s suggestion to do a maths and/or physics course is very good advice. Maths goes hand in hand with programming. A course in “applied maths” will also be very helpful if you are interested in graphics, vectors or any other kind of number crunching.

I don’t think we are ever experienced enough to make this decision.

[quote=62104:@Alwyn Bester]They say the two most important life decisions you make, you need to make at a time when you are least experienced to make them…

  1. when/who to marry
  2. what career path to follow

I would highly recommend you do an aptitude test before making your career path decisions. A good aptitude test will help you a lot to make an informed decision about your career, that plays into the strengths of your skills.

Computer science might also include algorithm design and analysis, binary trees, data structures etc. I speak under correction but I think computer science is more concerned with the details of software design, while software development looks at the bigger picture of the software solution.

Mike’s suggestion to do a maths and/or physics course is very good advice. Maths goes hand in hand with programming. A course in “applied maths” will also be very helpful if you are interested in graphics, vectors or any other kind of number crunching.[/quote]
I do not know how aware you are of GCSEs but grade D is considered crap and grade C is the shining grade to get into any basic job, with the exception of the most horrid jobs. Thanks for your ideas. I already have a good background with computer programming and please bare in mind this is a level 2 coarse. I have found that they do actually have another pathway for computer science so I have read the stuff they are doing and I feel that this coarse would work for me. It seems that computer science in this case, is just a basic programming coarse.

THANKS

Oliver, I did GCSE’s got four C’s and four D’s, went on to do A-levels and a degree. GCSE’s become totally irrelevant you will see in time. I have never been asked for any job what GCSE’s I got. You need them to get on the next ladder in education but once there they become nothing. To be honest, I made a bit of a hash of my A-Levels but again that became irrelevant once I had my degree. After 17 years at work (10 years in project management) I now find that no one really cares about my degree either and that has become irrelevant, it is now all about experience and what I can manage as a PM.

Don’t get hung up on grade D or C in GCSE, get on the course you want and work hard. A good grade gets you on the next rung of the ladder but enthusiasm, drive and ambition count a lot more to an employer worth their salt.

I’m old & cranky so here goes ………. :stuck_out_tongue:

Get a job - and quit several of them or get fired
Go work for a bunch of different places doing radically different things
Travel - and work wherever you trace if you can (it makes it so you can stay longer usually)
Figure out what you LIKE doing
There are a LOT of people who do things they HATE every day
There are people making no money doing jobs they hate
There are people making lots of money doing things they hate
Don’t fall into a job or career just because you couldn’t figure out what you like doing

And once you’ve done all this THEN you’ll have an idea what you want to do
Go to school & get whatever education you need to do that

Or, as in my daughters case, she knows what she loves but she’ll never be a professional at it and make a living so so found another passion & does that and kept the other as a hobby so she can do it for her own pleasure.

When I went to university there were far too many people whose sole motivation for being there was “Mom and dad thought I should go”. So they spent years (and in some cases I literally means YEARS) taking courses trying to figure out what they wanted to do with their life.

And they wasted time, space & all sorts of other things - and one lady I started first year with had not progress past first year course trying to figure out what she wanted to do when I graduated)

[quote=62116:@Norman Palardy]I’m old & cranky so here goes ………. :stuck_out_tongue:

Get a job - and quit several of them or get fired
Go work for a bunch of different places doing radically different things
Travel - and work wherever you trace if you can (it makes it so you can stay longer usually)
Figure out what you LIKE doing
There are a LOT of people who do things they HATE every day
There are people making no money doing jobs they hate
There are people making lots of money doing things they hate
Don’t fall into a job or career just because you couldn’t figure out what you like doing

And once you’ve done all this THEN you’ll have an idea what you want to do
Go to school & get whatever education you need to do that

Or, as in my daughters case, she knows what she loves but she’ll never be a professional at it and make a living so so found another passion & does that and kept the other as a hobby so she can do it for her own pleasure.

When I went to university there were far too many people whose sole motivation for being there was “Mom and dad thought I should go”. So they spent years (and in some cases I literally means YEARS) taking courses trying to figure out what they wanted to do with their life.

And they wasted time, space & all sorts of other things - and one lady I started first year with had not progress past first year course trying to figure out what she wanted to do when I graduated)[/quote]
Thank you but I do know what I definitely want to do when I am older. As long as it is a good coarse and it orientates mostly around programming, I am happy.

And most of important of all: be able to learn from your mistakes! This isn’t learning:

You apply to me like that I wouldn’t take you either (and I’m not a native English speaker)

bare = naked
bear = animal / carry

[quote=62124:@Markus Winter]And most of important of all: be able to learn from your mistakes! This isn’t learning:

You apply to me like that I wouldn’t take you either (and I’m not a native English speaker)

bare = naked
bear = animal / carry[/quote]
Haha, I would not apply like that.

I’d try my best to break this habit of misspelling if I were you. Just because you can catch the mistakes on a resumé, doesn’t mean anything. You’re going to be typing a lot. Do it well. I think the worst part is you’re not even misspelling really, you’re using the wrong words. It reflects really poorly on you since (if I recall correctly) English is your native language and you’re a teenager in high school. You’re old enough to know better by now.

We all make mistakes, that’s human and nothing to be ashamed of. But repeatedly making these mistakes shows that it isn’t a typo, it is something you are doing naturally.

Trust me because I know first-hand, these people you are talking to now very well could be your future employers. I was 14 years old when I started with REALbasic, and if you’re not aware, I’m an ex-Xojo employee and am currently working full time for another member of this community. Take my advice: this stuff matters.

Maybe he wanted a collage with coarse edges? This might be a good theme in a couple weeks.

@Oliver Scott-Brown: Something to consider: iTunes U has lots of excellent classes available from some of the top schools around the world. It may be worth your while to check some of these out to actually see what it is that is being taught in the classes you are interested in.

I found this one to be particularly good: Programming Methodology @ Stanford U

Too damned many bunnies not enough LOLcats :stuck_out_tongue:

Note that there’s a panda for Pat.

I thought this was a “Where’s Wally!” thread!

Right there near the middle with the hat on :stuck_out_tongue:

[quote=62081:@Oliver Scott-Brown]Hey,

I do not expect anybody to have any knowledge of the coarse available at collages. But does anybody have any guesses to the difference between software development and computer science.[/quote]

Are you hoping to go to university after college? I did computing science at a UK university many years ago and it is certainly less focussed on software development (around 50% of the course). It covered various topics including hardware, networking, databases and so on. There was a lot more computing theory, and the programming that we did do wasn’t much use in the real world (you probably wouldn’t have heard of the languages they taught in then! I wasn’t even taught object-oriented programming, it was REALbasic that taught me that.)

I personally wish I had gone down a more specific software development route, but things turned out okay in the end. It’s good that you know what you want to do - I guess you need to ask the right people more questions, someone in your school is going to know the answer. Or pick up the phone and ask the college! Good luck.