Marzipan

Seems “Marzipan” was just a “code name”, as the release version (Xcode 11) is called “Catalyst”
supposedly in “most” situations it would be a simple checkmark to tell Xcode to compile for OSX instead of iOS

look there:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/blakespot/3141628573/in/photostream/

[quote=440207:@Emile Schwarz]look there:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/blakespot/3141628573/in/photostream/[/quote]
so they reused the name… but no relation

Or here - https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/230457/almond-marzipan-cookie/

Yummm

:smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

Catalyst is the name for the new feature to bring iPad apps to Mac.
More or less by making UIKit a native framework on Mac.

Looks nice for people who have an iPad app and like to port it.

[quote=440224:@Christian Schmitz]Catalyst is the name for the new feature to bring iPad apps to Mac.
More or less by making UIKit a native framework on Mac.

Looks nice for people who have an iPad app and like to port it.[/quote]
Right. And guys, Apple provide all these WWDC sessions for free, so you can just go watch them. No need to “speculate”.

So, Apple XCode will now provide cross platform between iPad and Desktop with little or no coding.

A feat not yet provided by our champion of cross platform, because of a strange parti pris of deliberate dialectal change from a language that had been it’s constant success for decades…

The best new feature of the latest Xcode beta is that it almost works the same as Xojo.
You add a control, double click on it to reveal a list of events and Xcode adds all the necessary code for you, just like Xojo. Piece of cake.
So it more or less becomes a RAD environment. Super easy now to code for macOS and iOS.
Imo there is little benefit to use Xojo if the Apple devices are your only target.

This has been true for a very long time. Targeting any single platform with a tool designed for cross platform is not a great investment due to the lowest-common-denominator approach. You will always get “better” apps using the native tools. Xojo’s inadequacies are the compromise we make in order to target multiple platforms.

XCode or Swift ?

Not sure what you meant. Xcode is the tool. Swift and Objective-C are the languages that are used in Xcode.
But seeing Objective-C is deprecated, you only should use Swift.
It’s also the closest to Xojo. If you know how to code in Xojo, Swift is not difficult to learn. That’s most certainly true with the latest Xcode.

Swift as a language is easy to learn. Up to now, Xcode was much harder to grok than the Xojo IDE. I mean, really, dragging connection arrows around! The archaic file-oriented structure with class definitions that you don’t seem to instantiate anywhere. Maybe because I’m a hobbyist coder.

SwiftUI may now close the gap with Xojo, and certainly adds some cool functionality that Xojo can’t equal, like the live debugging on an attached device.

Good answer.

Now, Swift as a language exists for Linux and Windows…

None used here.

I think the percentage of commercially successful apps available only on macOS and iOS and no other platform is fairly small.

I also think the percentage of hobbyist coders who only want to create macOS and iOS apps and never web apps is fairly small.

Keep in mind that Xojo is very desirable not only if you want to create cross-platform versions of one particular app, but also if you sometimes want to create a desktop app and at other times on a different project want to create a web app. Especially for a “citizen coder” it is much more practical to master one language/framework than to use Xcode/Swift for Desktop/iOS apps and then use some other language and framework when the next project is a web app.

[quote=440348:@Art Gorski]Swift as a language is easy to learn. Up to now, Xcode was much harder to grok than the Xojo IDE. I mean, really, dragging connection arrows around! The archaic file-oriented structure with class definitions that you don’t seem to instantiate anywhere. Maybe because I’m a hobbyist coder.

SwiftUI may now close the gap with Xojo, and certainly adds some cool functionality that Xojo can’t equal, like the live debugging on an attached device.[/quote]

What I really like about SwiftUI is that when you changing code, you see the changes in realtime in your UI editor. That’s pretty cool and never seen before.

In the new Xojo Podcast, Paul talks about this. The difference is that SwiftUI generates the code and shows it to you. In Xojo, the code for this is not shown, letting you concentrate on your app code.

With respect for Paul and the podcast, I’ll just say that, as a long-time Xojo and Xcode developer, I suppose what you paraphrase is true, but it’s also kind of missing the point of SwiftUI. Nevertheless, there are many, many situations and environments in which I will continue to wholeheartedly recommend Xojo and its native apps.

In a way, SwiftUI is an evolution of Playground. Show immediately what code does.

That said, I can think of some circumstances where I rather not have constantly the result of code. It can be distracting. Especially when it requires some level of abstraction to get where I want to go.

Nota:
It is easy to watch the Xojo code of a Window: save as XML or Xojo native and read it from there.

Yes, this is different, but for those who love to see code: they can.

Well yes, it shows the extra code (Events, refs, …) but it is a huge step forward and creates very readable code. In the previous versions of Xcode, you still had to click/drag to auto create code etc.
Except for it is showing all the code, it is absolutely no distraction or more complex than Xojo.
IMO SwiftUI is awesome and will make the learning curve a lot less steep. In fact, it’s not steeper then learning Xojo for sure. Xojo really lost that advantage.