iOS email signatures

Totally not Xojo related. I have a signature that includes images - looks great in the signature editor, but shows blank boxes when composing. What have I missed?

Just doing a quick search, there may be size and dimension limits. I’d say 72ppi, no wider than 320px and overall no larger than 50K.

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For a client database I set up, I placed the signature JPEG on a server and placed the https link into the HTML-based email. I am assuming embedding a link is possible in a Signature.

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Quite a few law firms have their logos either hosted online somewhere or as an attachment that is coded to show as an image within the email somewhere (usually at the top or in the signature block).

It just comes down to proper coding, but I do caution that hosting changes can make it maddening when users open up emails to find a dead image placeholder / notice. So I’d recommend actually including the images as attachments somehow embedded into the HTML appearance, if such is possible.

One stumbling block on attach-and-code method is when you have to send to a secure email address that is configured to bounce anything with an attachment, so… it can be a tough choice.

Thanks for your suggestions. I’ve tried embedding html code, but that just shows as text - must be missing something there too :frowning:

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I’m not sure what email app you are using to compose your signature, but you should be able to Insert a picture that is a URL for the the picture if HTML editing is allowed in the signature creation.

You can test this using the URL for the Xojo logo: https://www.xojo.com/assets/img/logo.png
create a signature that uses the img tag like this screen capture:

Screenshot 2022-07-17 151537

Which I pasted into this reply and it displays as a logo image:

Xojo Logo

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Maybe the code is not allowed to be interpreted as HTML in some email clients or account settings?

This is something one might do out of reaction to stories about targeted phishing / hacking.

Here is one such story: How mercenary hackers sway litigation battles