Can software permanently damage your USB drive?

How easy is it for software to damage your USB drive. Can USB drives be permanently damage meaning making it impossible or difficult to get the USB drive to work like it did when it was first bought. For example, does compressing a USB drive break it PERMANENTLY. I am not taking about data loss but damage that affects the ability of the USB drive, even if that means permanently decreasing the space on the USB drive.

Thanks

The only way I can think of is to write over the life cycle of the device.

See http://www.getusb.info/what-is-the-life-cycle-of-a-usb-flash-drive/

Simply compressing it won’t affect it the least, apart from access time which will get even slower…

[quote=131988:@Michel Bujardet]The only way I can think of is to write over the life cycle of the device.

See http://www.getusb.info/what-is-the-life-cycle-of-a-usb-flash-drive/

Simply compressing it won’t affect it the least, apart from access time which will get even slower…[/quote]
So do you think in most cases the effects are nelegible? Bare in mind the file is around 5gb on 32gb USB drive. Thanks

I have not used compression since Windows 98 but at the time there was no downside besides speed.

Why do you need to compress the drive itself?

Isn’t this just a new thread carrying on from the one which Xojo staff locked?

Except the topic is about USB sticks and not what got the other thread locked …

I have feeling the 2 are connected somehow :slight_smile:

Don’t prosecute the intent :wink:

they possibly are but at least he’s not asking HOW to break the EULA

Theoretically you could damage hardware just through software, although I have never sen such a case occur.
Doesn’t mean you can’t - just that I have never seen it

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9286425/is-it-possible-to-permanently-damage-the-hardware-by-software

Devices like USB drives that are flash based only support a limited number of read / write cycles so, in theory, if you ran software that just read / wrote to them a lot you might damage them

Power cycling can harm some devices if you can do that in software

One of my favourite ‘support’ questions was a genuine (but obviously unfounded) complaint that

‘I installed your software yesterday and now my computer has caught fire’.

Is it me or does the phrase ‘damage that affects the ability of the USB drive, even if that means permanently decreasing the space on the USB drive.’ sound like a request for a way to actually damage someone’s machine in this way?
ie malware?

I see from ‘the other thread’ (I was asleep) that its probably not… (edit on the blink again)

“You worked on my computer last month and now I have a virus.”

“Could it be the porn sites you visited?”

I sometimes wish I could say what I’m thinking.

The great psychiatrist Car Jung may have inferred the whole thing is about archetypes in the making.

Countless movies have shown computers becoming mad and exploding as the result of software. Although there is not a hint of possibility that will ever happen in real life, the image has become part of popular culture as for feeble minds to believe it. Same difference for the virus thing. Most people have heard of computer viruses but known nothing about them but what urban legends coalport and irrational fear. So there you have it : ignorance compounded with stupidity.

I remember back in the early 1980s it was claimed that messing about with the registers in some peripheral chip in – I think – the original Commodore PET could indeed cause overheating leading to terminal damage. I don’t know of anyone who experienced this first hand. however.

Thanks.

Without presuming of the eventual validity of the information about the Pet, this has all the markings of the urban legends : someone having said that something occurs, but no way to find an actual witness or to get any information about how to reproduce the thing.

That said, I know at least of one instance where software may run hardware awry : the iMac fan is piloted by software, and it can indeed get crazy http://support.apple.com/kb/TS1433

Which does not mean the iMac will explode. On the contrary, extra ventilation will most certainly avert any overheating. But it must be darn scary :wink:

Confucius say:" man who dig pyramid shaped hole always blame shovel"

Well yes, there are other ways to accomplish this. Never forget that today hardware features can be added via software upgrades :wink:

iOS 8 Wave

And speaking of support questions: When I was working in the computer department of a French department store in the early nineties, a colleague from customer support came back highly amused from an urgent job he had been called to. The customer complained aout the installation process not working and ruining the new PC. He was right, although he had done everything exactly computer told him to do. It turned out the manufacturer should have chosen a wording like “replace installation disk” instead of “insert disk 2” – the 5 1/4" Floppy drive stopped working after the third disk had been inserted on top of the other two …