BBC Nostalgia - The Computer Programme 1982

I see that the BBC has released their 1982 series, The Computer Programme on the internet. Although looking a little dated, based around the BBC Micro it was ahead of its time in 1982. Probably the programme that got me into computer programming as a young lad. Some of the items in it however were very insightful to where computers are now, although clearly I would not have realised this at the time. Not sure if the episodes are viewable elsewhere than the UK, but a great trip down memory lane for me.

https://computer-literacy-project.pilots.bbcconnectedstudio.co.uk/e2b5dd518bb6fca385dbc4368148bdc1

Video works in France.

And in Belgium

And Australia.

And in the US.

Another colony (Canada) reporting in…

LOL, I only mentioned that it may not work elsewhere as the BBC are notoriously protective of their content, seems its old enough that they don’t care :-), anyway, 5 more episodes to go.

That’s the past but this could be the future: CANZUK.
And my boys are pretty excited about it :slight_smile:

Anyway, back on topic: it’s strangely compelling viewing, isn’t it? The school I went to had one computer (iirc a Commodore that had been donated by a parent) and one teacher that was going to evening class and then relaying what he’d learned to the kids in the school’s (optional) Computer Club.

I still have a working BBC-B 32K computer. Was my first computer.

For those interested in nostalgia programming, there is BBC Basic for Windows. It is obviously not Object Oriented and cannot be compared with Xojo. It is procedural programming.

I think it has a demo version. It can also handle Windows forms by API’s but that will kill the nostalgia feeling not? There is even an assembler available in it.

Indeed, the Acorn BBC-B was far ahead of its time. A true British product to be really proud of. Mine is connected to a LCD television with Scart and using the RGB on the BBC-B. Probably you have to solder it yourself. But that is the true BBC-B style. Nowadays programmers are spoiled.

Special thanks for Richard Russel, who brought us the nostalgia by developing BBC Basic for Windows / Mac