Apple's Project Marzipan?

Apple Plans Combined iPhone, iPad & Mac Apps to Create One User Experience

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-12-20/apple-is-said-to-have-plan-to-combine-iphone-ipad-and-mac-apps

I presume that was the goal for Swift? Code convergence between iOS and macOS?

Will be interesting how that compares to Xojo.

Interesting idea… but I can’t imagine how it would “work”…
While the iPhone/iPad environment has a finite number of screens and are designed to be touch, and usually without a physical keyboard… the Desktop experience has hundreds of screen sizes, may have multiple screens, and usually with a physical keyboard.

I can see “sharing” the “business logic” part, but then that can “kinda” be done now within Swift… unless the real goal of “Marzipan” is to create a single set of frameworks combining the UI and NS variations that exist today…
But even then… the UI portion between iOS and macOS via Swift is vastly different due mostly to the presentation devices involved.

From another article

Now that makes more sense… more an iOS emulator perhaps? Which should be easier, since they already have a simulator.
However I have found that 3D graphics (Scenekit run 100x faster on the device than in the simulator)

‘One User Experience’

Why am I thinking Windows 8? :wink:

April fools day? I read about this, too.

Except April was months ago… and most of these articles are “today”
and it does make sense to allow iOS apps on a Desktop machine… Heck some of my own apps I run in the simulator just because it is more conveent than digging out my iTouch or iPad

Sounds a lot like what @Marco Bambini did with his new Creo product. He is the creator of SQLabs cubeSQL and Creo ported UIKit to Mac for development/debugging purposes.

It is kind of competitive with Xojo iOS but also an entirely new thing.

There are certainly iOS apps that I wish I could run on my Mac if for no other reason than convenience.

I would think of that as Widgets/Desk Accessory (remember those?) type stuff and maybe some games… which I can see would be useful but not as a replacement for full fledged desktop apps or at the cost of not being able to run Windows on a Mac.

On a Mac, that could (obviously) be integrated into the OS through emulation or the inclusion of an ARM coprocessor…

But I do worry that might discourage the production of full featured desktop apps for many uses.

  • karen

This reminds me a bit of Photos.app, and it’s use of a certain “UXKit” (which is only available to Apple, but not (yet?) to developers). The Articles about this UXKit are from 2015 - maybe in 2018 we’ll see something like this available? We’ll see - I just know that I don’t like this limited Photos.app, even if Apple suggested their Aperture users to switch to this shiny new product…
This app looks quite similar across devices - and shares quite a lot of functionality in all targets. Especially noticeable when the same library-handling-related bug(s) exist in both iOS and macOS version of Photos.app :slight_smile:
While this is an example of Apple’s current vision of “one user experience”, this rumour could simply be the next step of such an “already existing framework”. Whatever it is or will be - it won’t be to everyone’s liking. It sure makes sense for certain apps, but certainly not every single one. And while i assume something like this (if the rumours become true) will be optional, developers should look into it anyway. Be it just to ditch it for now - but for getting an idea of what might be required in a couple of years and how to deal with it.

Look at Apple’s “Photos” as this was built for this purpose. An iOS application ported to the Mac.

Edit: Here’s what I take from this.

  1. It will be easier for developers who target iOS to port their apps to the Mac with very little work. This means that the Mac could finally become a gaming platform.

  2. For companies that actually care, they will still be able to ship high quality desktop level applications, high quality iPad applications and high quality phone apps. As they’ll still be able to run dedicated platform teams.

I suspect it will simply result in far more applications for the entire Apple ecosystem, with most being targeted for the lowest common denominator (the phone) just with slightly different interfaces.

It means we’ll have to work a lot harder to get our products noticed.

Dumb apps prevail. Anything for more sophisticated users will struggle.

In another 10 years probably no-one will write anything longer than a paragraph and most will struggle to write a sentence.

What was Universal Applications ? (Classic and Cocoa Applications in a container)…

Some kind of two in one “Application”.

Only drawout: the size of the package (but who cares beside me ?).

You mean this tongue-in-cheek of course. Like gaming for kids or for people like my mom who play candy crush on her phone/tablet. Not for real gaming like eSports right?

That is no sport at all, just like (Mirror, UK:)

Huawei & Samsung are already building up for Software that runs on Mobile and Desktop. They already released Phones which are able to offer a near Desktop like experience with external periphery.

We really discussed in our family years ago, why no-one is making us able to attach external Screens, Mouse, Keyboard,… to our Phones to help us (customers) to get rid of carrying a mac-/Notebook with us. Our Phones are getting more Powerful with each generation and it was just a question of time until our Phones will be fast enough to serve as a Desktop PC.

Thinking about this, it’s just a logical consequence to make us able to use Software which is installed on our Phone and offer Mobile and Desktop uses with a single installation.

just my 2cents

I agree with Sascha. The goal will be to plug your Phone into a base station with Monitor, keyboard, mouse, storage, etc and continue working …

I agree with you. But the market doesn’t (http://www.cnn.com/2016/05/29/sport/esports-revolution-revenue-audience-growth/index.html). Just like Bitcoin, or the AppStore, or any miriad of things that came after my generation and I could not fathom why would anyone ever pay for such “services”. But here we are, and the money is out there saying otherwise.

[quote=365719:@Dave S]Interesting idea… but I can’t imagine how it would “work”…
While the iPhone/iPad environment has a finite number of screens and are designed to be touch, and usually without a physical keyboard… the Desktop experience has hundreds of screen sizes, may have multiple screens, and usually with a physical keyboard.

I can see “sharing” the “business logic” part, but then that can “kinda” be done now within Swift… unless the real goal of “Marzipan” is to create a single set of frameworks combining the UI and NS variations that exist today…
But even then… the UI portion between iOS and macOS via Swift is vastly different due mostly to the presentation devices involved.

From another article

Now that makes more sense… more an iOS emulator perhaps? Which should be easier, since they already have a simulator.
However I have found that 3D graphics (Scenekit run 100x faster on the device than in the simulator)[/quote]
Umm, could work the same way that Android allows their apps to run on a Pixelbook or a Samsung S8/Note8 with a dex dock and a mouse and keyboard.

OS X and iOS are both Unix based (as in Android for that mater), so creating compatibility for running the code isn’t difficult.

And that would definitely be a copy of Samsung with the Dex dock.

The easiest (and in my opinion best way to approach this)… dump iOS and port macOS to the iPhone/iPad platform…

Actually I don’t. There are some impressive games on the iOS App Store (considering) and the more they are adopted and played on the macOS, the more likely A+ games are likely to be ported to the Mac… Oh, but then Apple have all but killed off OpenGL, so then again maybe not.