Apple's "Bad record" at backwards compatibility

[quote=113337:@Torsten Gaidies]This one looks like a Quadrocopter with display :slight_smile:

[/quote]
Such elegance!

What is nice about that… it is hovers just above your lap… so it doesn’t bake your… well you know :slight_smile:

The timing must be off, since the iPod came out in 2001 and this can’t have happened before the warranty of that first model had run off. So I assume 2003 or thereabouts.

I can’t comment on this since I didn’t face it (both my iPods were stolen, so I decided to stop buying them) nor do I remember it. I wouldn’t argue against it since I’m not saying Apple is a magical perfect company.

I wouldn’t feel right saying categorically that Apple didn’t use to turn back out-of-warranty iPods ten years ago, even if I can’t recall any news about it.

I do know that Apple nowadays doesn’t do this and will happily fix your ten year old iPod if you’re willing to pay for it, though. A different matter is that fixing some equipment makes little sense financially.

We may be stretching the concept of “Luxury item” if we’re including Apple in this. Being arguably more costly (it depends on what you’re willing to sacrifice in the comparison, usually) doesn’t turn a brand into a luxury item. Only into an expensive one.

The comparison isn’t fair because Rolex is not considered one of the leaders in a fast-moving technology sector. Roles, as other luxury brands, use pride in durability as part of their marketing image since innovation is costly and it pays to keep the same model for years and years, selling that as a plus.

Also, nobody could blame Rolex of planned obsolescence as people don’t become confused and think a watch stops working when a new one comes out. Nobody complains because the new quadruple tourbillon à différentiel can’t be installed in place of their “obsolete” flying double-axis tourbillon.

Apple’s image of planned obsolescence comes from way more pedestrian (and inaccurate) user perceptions, coupled with the sheer pleasure that it’s for news agencies to talk about Apple negatively. A couple of famous documentaries that took this as their subject have helped perpetuate that image. Survivorship bias and selective memory have done the rest.

Apple now is a history of success but during many years it was a struggling second stringer where the competition had 95% of the market on a bad year. This meant it had to keep moving and changing direction and this had the side effect of leaving people behind, which is sad but the alternative may have been worse.

For years Apple has had no financial problems and a lot of things have changed. The good thing is that they keep zig and zagging to maintain a lead they’ve deservedly found, the even better thing is that they can do better with the people they leave behind. As I said: If the discussion is whether Apple used to be one way, I wouldn’t argue. If the discussion is whether Apple is that way now, I think it’s easily disprovable.

Even more so since Cook took reign, as he’s repeatedly proven.

Please forgive me for not having checked the exact release date. I clearly remember the horror stories sprouting in forums and newsgroups in the early 2000 decade, so you maybe right about 2003, could have been earlier. As I did not have the issue, my memory is not perfect.

My point was not to say Apple still does it, but it committed the mistake of doing it once. And as we all know, it is often enough to keep the image forever.

[quote]We may be stretching the concept of “Luxury item” if we’re including Apple in this. Being arguably more costly (it depends on what you’re willing to sacrifice in the comparison, usually) doesn’t turn a brand into a luxury item. Only into an expensive one.
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Expensive, if you will. Not average. Not “grey”. High brand recognition. Recognized design used in almost every movie. Fashionable stores. Similarities with Ban & Olufsen are many. Is that luxury ? Wel, this is probably the closest there is in the computing world.

Journalists would not keep their job if they did not report about issues. How could they report about all the age old PCs everywhere. Nothing exciting about these clunky old boxes. Better talk about the wonder kid on the block.

The quick turnaround also plays a big role in the picture. When I bought my MacBook at the Los Angeles Apple Store, about a couple weeks later I was on my way to the airport and billboards where showing the MacBook Air. Last year I bought a Retina iPad and yet again weeks after the iPad Air was introduced. This is not an integrated time bomb, but it is real obsolescence created by Apple. I know some people love to hate Apple. But precisely because it is a fast moving hardware company, it does create obsolescence through quick turnaround. It is not illegitimate, and not unlike what happens in the automobile world. Still, as compared to the ever more conservative world of PCs, it can bring an image of a trendy, maybe somewhat whimsical brand.

To sum it up, I am not saying Apple did not learn how to cater to its long time customers. They care well for them. But the very nature of technological evolution makes it difficult for them to support older models. It is probably not so bad for computers, but it it quite apparent for phones, where for instance we went from GSM to 3G, now 4G and already talking about 5G in just a few years. Obsolescence is not brought by Apple itself, it is the result of the technological environment.

My antique PowerBook “Wall Street” from 1998 or so with PPC and Mac OS 9 still works perfectly. It even can run Mac OS X Jaguar. The battery is dead, though, but that’s probably more the fault of power storage device technology than Apple’s. My point is that it still does exactly what I bought it for. And is as reliable as ever. Trouble is, I wanted something else, even needed it to keep current. So I decided it was obsolete. The user does play a role in this whole issue. When I buy the very latest iPhone, I do not need it, I want it. It is obsolescence as the result of consumer behavior, not hardware failure.

I wasn’t correcting you. Just trying to remember.

Mine is more recent, but a similar story. I bought a PowerBook G4 12" in 2003 (fantastic laptop, too). I stopped using it when the Intel macs came in, in 2007. My mother in law uses it every day, though. She says it’s more than she needs. I pull my hair whenever I need to use it :smiley:

I had a two of the PB G4 12" machines: a 800Mhz model and the very last 12" they made. Absolutely fantastic machines, really loved them.

I’m sure you know, but rumor has it that Apple are working on a 12" Retina MacBook Air.

The sooner the better. Since the Powerbook from now some 16 years ago, I cannot really work with those tiny screens :wink: So I will have an excellent excuse to indulge :wink:

[quote=113387:@Gavin Smith]I had a two of the PB G4 12" machines: a 800Mhz model and the very last 12" they made. Absolutely fantastic machines, really loved them.
I’m sure you know, but rumor has it that Apple are working on a 12" Retina MacBook Air.[/quote]

Such a fantastic machine in such a compact package. People frown at small screens now the same way we used to at 17" screens ten years ago. It’s like that craziness with the huge phones.

I love my laptops small and powerful, but it seems small now is associated with netbooks (MBAs are thin, but not small)

12" retina MBA. I drool just to think about it :smiley:

You live in Western Canada so a horse and buggy and the norm out there :stuck_out_tongue:

Ah yes
We live in igloos & dirt huts & hunt for meals every day :stuck_out_tongue:

That’s further North :wink:

The problem I have is not with Apple deprecating APIs, although I do get pissed when Photoshop no longer works and I have to purchase the upgrade. The problem I have with Apple right now is their introduction of new App Store rules without warning. The only notification we now get is when Apple won’t accept your software.

It doesn’t take much for Apple to send registered developers an e-mail, altering them to forthcoming changes in the App Store.

If you also look at the deprecated API, from a business perspective, it’s actually a good thing. For if it didn’t happen, I’d still be using Photoshop 3! In fact a buddy of mine is still working Photoshop 7 on his PC, because it still works. He’s saved way more money than I have, who’s had to buy PS upgrades every couple of years. Now I’m locked into their stupid subscription service (which is actually a good business model).

Good for them. A business is good when the seller and the buyer are happy.

Can I join in your conversation friends I am new to the forum myself Charlesthomas.

Please guid eme friends may i know about what topic you are discussing

Cough * SPAM * Cough

Ban this guy, please.