Need license key for realBasic, around 2008

  1. last week

    Hi. I'm new to Xojo/realBASIC. I'm evaluating some third-party software and I need a license key for an old version of realBASIC. I think something around 2008r2 would likely work (but I'm not sure).

    Can I get a 30 day eval license key for such an old version of realBASIC?

    Thanks, --Marc Riehm.

  2. Tim P

    Dec 2 Pre-Release Testers Rochester, NY

    Reach out to hello@xojo.com

  3. Christian S

    Dec 2 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro, XDC Speakers, Third Party Store Germany

    You could buy a current license and try to port the project.

    Today you get it with a 20% discount...

  4. Gavin S

    Dec 2 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro UK

    @Marc R Hi. I'm new to Xojo/realBASIC. I'm evaluating some third-party software and I need a license key for an old version of realBASIC. I think something around 2008r2 would likely work (but I'm not sure).

    Perhaps if you can tell us more about why you think such an old version, we could give you better advice. If not, Tim's post above has what you need.

  5. Craig G

    Dec 2 Australia

    Ah yes - Real Basic 2008.
    Fond memories of it's single file executable.

  6. Michel B

    Dec 3 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro

    You should be able to load the project in the current version of Xojo.

    What is specific to that older version ?

  7. Craig G

    Dec 3 Australia

    @Michel B What is specific to that older version ?

    I think RB 2008 is still in demand because it can build a single file executable program (no external resources).

  8. Norman P

    Dec 3 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro under a bus
    Edited last week

    That format was quite .. uh .. interesting in how it achieved that. Lets just say that.
    http://forums.realsoftware.com/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=22261&p=117761&hilit=single+file+executable#p117761

  9. Craig G

    Dec 3 Australia
    Edited last week

    I'll admit I'm guilty of using RB2008 long after it's expiry date to distribute simple programs without all the hassles of multiple files.
    Before that VB6 did the same thing.
    These days I simply create a self extracting zip file which does the job. It's a single file executable which extracts all the library and resource folders to a temporary folder then automatically runs the program.

  10. Louis D

    Dec 3 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro QC, Canada
    Edited last week

    Before that VB6 did the same thing.

    Only because the VB runtime DLL's were installed by default with Windows. On server Windows releases, you have to install the runtime librairies manually.

  11. Norman P

    Dec 3 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro under a bus

    @Craig G I'll admit I'm guilty of using RB2008 long after it's expiry date to distribute simple programs without all the hassles of multiple files.

    This is one reason MS recommends using an installer
    It makes setting it up easy and removal similarly easy

    I know its a hassle as a dev but it is simple for end users

  12. Michel B

    Dec 3 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro

    @Craig G I think RB 2008 is still in demand because it can build a single file executable program (no external resources).

    That would not be necessary to evaluate Xojo.

  13. Craig G

    Dec 3 Australia
    Edited last week

    @Norman P This is one reason MS recommends using an installer
    It makes setting it up easy and removal similarly easy

    I know its a hassle as a dev but it is simple for end users

    As they say - Horses for courses.
    None of the staff where I work have Administrator privileges to install programs. I send them small programs containing algorithms to convert their csv files into a set format for database input.
    They open the email and run the program directly from the attachment. It isn't needed again after that.

  14. 7 days ago

    Dave S

    Dec 3 San Diego, California USA

    they are not allowed to INSTALL a program, but they can run one that is emailed to them?
    a security disaster just waiting to happen

    Where I worked before I retired.... we couldn't do either... Install apps or email them even

  15. Jason K

    Dec 3 Pre-Release Testers

    @Craig G As they say - Horses for courses.
    None of the staff where I work have Administrator privileges to install programs. I send them small programs containing algorithms to convert their csv files into a set format for database input.
    They open the email and run the program directly from the attachment. It isn't needed again after that.

    Sounds perfect for Python scripts! Much more secure like Dave mentioned.

  16. Craig G

    Dec 3 Australia

    @Dave S Dave Sisemore 2 hours ago San Diego, California USA
    they are not allowed to INSTALL a program, but they can run one that is emailed to them?
    a security disaster just waiting to happen

    Executables can be emailed as long as they are zipped (Lotus notes).
    If it is an external client I can also write the code in VBA for Excel which gets through most email security filters.

  17. Dave S

    Dec 3 San Diego, California USA

    like I said

    a security disaster just waiting to happen

    but then it is not I that has to answer for that disaster

  18. 6 days ago

    Don L

    Dec 4 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Florence, South Carolina USA

    @Craig G Executables can be emailed as long as they are zipped

    Not a single client of mine (think larger companies) accepts ZIP files as email attachments (and haven't for some number of years now) ... and believe me, I have heard the horror stories from them regarding what happened before they shut off that spigot!

  19. Craig G

    Dec 4 Australia
    Edited 6 days ago

    @Don L Not a single client of mine (think larger companies) accepts ZIP files as email attachments (and haven't for some number of years now) ...

    I realise we are getting way off topic but I'm curious how you email 30 or more attachments as that is often the case for me.
    We are encouraged to zip files before email to reduce multiple attachments, and reduce file size and to make saving attachments simple.
    A zipped file gets scanned like everything else (password protected zip files are blocked) and at the end of the day it's internal email, the sender can be identified and is risking his/her job by sending anything malicious.
    Whether it's zipped or not and end user makes the decision whether to trust it and open it.
    I've never had a zip file rejected by any popular mail program Gmail, Yahoo etc. if it contains legitimate (harmless) contents except perhaps AOL if the user had opted for no attachments. I zip and send hundreds of files every month all over the world to business addresses also.

  20. Bill M

    Dec 4 Sedona, AZ

    Gmail will not allow a zip attachment. It will allow a google drive share.

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