The 7 Deadly Sins Of Programming

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  2. 4 days ago

    Karen A

    May 15 Pre-Release Testers

    @Peter R The kilometre isn't (or at least wasn't) defined arbitrarily: "The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole..." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metre ). The kilometre is, of course, 1,000 metres.

    These days the official definition of the metre is the snappy "length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 second".

    But chosing that as the definition was arbitrary and not the original definition. At one time there was a physical standard meter bar IIRC. It is certainly not an intuitive one!

  3. Christian S

    May 15 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro, XDC Speakers Germany

    The arbitrary length is not the thing.

    The great benefit on the metric system is the use of 10 as factor and the relation to other SI units.

    You know from definition how many liters of water fill a 1m^3 cube.

  4. Rick A

    May 15 (Brazil. GMT-3:00)

    The International System of Units (SI, Système international (d'unités)) is the modern form of the metric system, and is the most widely used system of measurement. It's a coherent system of units of measurement built on seven base units from nature, which are the ampere, kelvin, second, meter, kilogram, candela, mole, and a set of twenty prefixes to the unit names and unit symbols that may be used when specifying multiples and fractions of the units. The system also specifies names for 22 derived units, such as lumen and watt, for other common physical quantities.

    The base units are derived from INVARIANT CONSTANTS OF NATURE, such as the speed of light in vacuum and the triple point of water, which can be observed and measured with great accuracy, and just one physical artifact. But that is changing. The artifact is the international prototype kilogram, certified in 1889, and consisting of a cylinder of platinum-iridium, which nominally has the same mass as one liter of water at the freezing point. Its stability has been a matter of significant concern, culminating in a revision of the definition of the base units ENTIRELY in terms of constants of nature, and the new Kg is a derivative of the Planck constant and new exact masses can be found everywhere without the original prototype.

    The "metric system" is beautiful, exact, easy to handle, easy to calculate, and now independent of a master prototype's held somewhere.

    Who would use systems based on body imprecise parts like inches or feet, and weird not decimal fractions of them? That's so medieval.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_System_of_Units

  5. Dave S

    May 15 San Diego, California USA

    @Rick A Who would use systems based on body imprecise parts like inches or feet, and weird not decimal fractions of them? T

    THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.... that is who :)

  6. Ulrich B

    May 16 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Europe (Germany, Berlin) · xo...

    @Paul L Yeah, the XDC Marrott did not list the 13th floor, skipping from 12 to 14.

    Nothing compared to forgetting one entire floor!

    https://www.the-postillon.com/2017/09/botched-job-by-builders.html
    :D

  7. Rick A

    May 16 (Brazil. GMT-3:00)

    @Dave S THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.... that is who

    Yep. We know. You also know I was joking about it.
    But the good'ol Imperial System still have some remnants parts around the world transitioning.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_the_United_Kingdom
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_Ireland
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_New_Zealand
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_Australia

    The bad part is that people get educated using imperial, but when they need to create scientific papers, or projects, even in US, they need to think and write using the metric, the "universal" standard.

  8. Rick A

    May 16 (Brazil. GMT-3:00)
    Edited 4 days ago

    @Ulrich B Nothing compared to forgetting one entire floor!

    That's unbelievably dumb, without material documentation, people would think it was a tale.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khGiK-DWNFY

  9. Emile S

    May 16 Europe (France, Strasbourg)

    @Rick A The bad part is that people get educated using imperial, but when they need to create scientific papers, or projects, even in US, they need to think and write using the metric, the "universal" standard.

    And this process is error prone.

    We'd better all use the same measures to avoid troubles as much as possible.

  10. scott b

    May 16 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro local coffee shop

    @Ulrich B Nothing compared to forgetting one entire floor!

    https://www.the-postillon.com/2017/09/botched-job-by-builders.html
    :D

    WOW just WOW! i can see missing a floor if it were at the top but in the middle. doesnt common sense kick in and make you ask the question "what about this missing floor?"

  11. Tim S

    May 16 Canterbury, UK

    @Rick A Yep. We know. You also know I was joking about it.
    But the good'ol Imperial System still have some remnants parts around the world transitioning.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_the_United_Kingdom
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_Ireland
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_New_Zealand
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_Australia

    The bad part is that people get educated using imperial, but when they need to create scientific papers, or projects, even in US, they need to think and write using the metric, the "universal" standard.

    Don't they get taught metric in the science classes at school? We did that and thought nothing of it.

  12. scott b

    May 16 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro local coffee shop

    @Rick A The bad part is that people get educated using imperial, but when they need to create scientific papers, or projects, even in US, they need to think and write using the metric, the "universal" standard.

    in my scientific classes (back in the late 80s/early 90s) in college they taught metric. in all the rest of the schooling was imperial. in CS track (not the IS (the softer side of IT) track), we had to use both and I had to write (in many languages) a converter from metric to imperial and back. And I was not at one of the more aggressive/hard core schools.

    so depending on the school and program depends on if metric is taught or not.

  13. scott b

    May 16 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro local coffee shop

    @Tim S Don't they get taught metric in the science classes at school? We did that and thought nothing of it.

    in the US, we do. just in the science classes.

  14. Karen A

    May 16 Pre-Release Testers

    @scott b in the US, we do. just in the science classes.

    Being Chemist I can attest to that so I have been working in metric units my whole life... but for example while I will Celsius at work, if someone says it is 25C outside I have no idea how warm that would feel.. Now if you say 77F, I think nice day!

    - karen

  15. Ulrich B

    May 16 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Europe (Germany, Berlin) · xo...
    Edited 4 days ago

    @scott b WOW just WOW! i can see missing a floor if it were at the top but in the middle. doesnt common sense kick in and make you ask the question "what about this missing floor?"

    Well, there are some trolls who say that the Postillon would be a satirical newspaper like the onion. Which cannot be for a paper that gives the exact calculation for inserting an USB stick not upside down on first attempt …
    https://www.the-postillon.com/2017/08/man-inserts-usb-stick.html

  16. Tim P

    May 16 Pre-Release Testers Rochester, NY

    Now that's an experience everyone relates to :P

  17. Alberto D

    May 16 Pre-Release Testers

    https://www.the-postillon.com/p/faq.html

    1. Are these true news and stories?
    No, everything you can read here is satire and therefore all made-up. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.

  18. Louis D

    May 16 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Montreal, QC, Canada

    https://www.the-postillon.com/p/faq.html

    1. Are these true news and stories?
    No, everything you can read here is satire and therefore all made-up. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.

    So, if that paragraph is on the site, does it not mean that it too is made-up and therefore stories are not made-up?

  19. 3 days ago

    Confusion over metric and imperial units led to an Air Canada Boeing 767 running out of fuel at 41,000 ft (12,496.8 m) in 1983. The ground crew loaded 22,300 pounds of fuel instead of the required 22,300 kilograms. There was further confusion due to fuel gauge faults and the fact that the airline was in the middle of converting its operations from imperial to metric but the result was that the aircraft had about half the required amount of fuel. The pilots managed to glide it to a safe landing on a disused airfield. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gimli_Glider if you're interested in the details.)

  20. scott b

    May 16 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro local coffee shop

    @Alberto D;Poo https://www.the-postillon.com/p/faq.html

    i feel much better about humanity.

  21. Tim S

    May 16 Canterbury, UK

    @Karen A Being Chemist I can attest to that so I have been working in metric units my whole life... but for example while I will Celsius at work, if someone says it is 25C outside I have no idea how warm that would feel.. Now if you say 77F, I think nice day!

    You get used to it. I moved:

    UK -> Switzerland -> US -> UK

    and found you just adapt after a while.

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