Considering Mojave..

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  2. last year

    Tim S

    21 Jan 2019 Testers Canterbury, UK

    @Sam R I think the major problem here is that people are not excited enough to buy new Macs; is this a hardware issue, a software issue, or is it both?

    This is a late 2012 Mini with 10Gig and a reasonably-sized SSD in addition to the internal drive. Why would I need to change it? Where's my motivation? It has the mobo connectors so a second drive could be added, likewise the memory was upgraded when I got it off eBay.

    I've not tried Mojave on it yet but assume it will run.

  3. Beatrix W

    21 Jan 2019 Testers, Third Party Store Europe (Germany)

    Today I did the first full build of both versions of my app: a couple of helper apps + main app, 2 times for 2 versions. dmgs also created. Thanks to the IDE communicator the manual effort is minimal. But - man - this takes soooo long. I got an i7 iMac but I want a faster computer.

  4. Dave S

    21 Jan 2019 San Diego, California USA

    @Beatrix W I got an i7 iMac but I want a faster computer.

    I think for the most part "computer speed" is a preception. I'll bet (certain processes not withstanding) that when you got that i7 iMac,it was "WOW! this is fast" (I know that is how I reacted)... yet today (a mere 9 months later). Is is more like "yeah , it runs ok"

    I remember back when I bought my 2nd computer... it had a clock speed 2x that of the first one.... and it was BLAZING!
    Today I'd fall asleep waiting for that one to actually do something (FYI.... it was a 4mhz Z80.... yes MEGAHERTZ, NOT GIGHERTZ, meaning "techincally" my iMac is 1000x faster...in reality its more).... The problem is that 1000x more speed has to do 500x more work

  5. Tim J

    21 Jan 2019 Testers, Xojo Pro N. Phoenix, AZ

    I think back to the work that I got done on a 286 system running SCO XENIX with X11 or a Sun 3/60 ... When we got our first 386, it was like someone had given us leisure time in a box - it was 3x faster at compiling than the 286, so BRU only took 3-1/2 hours instead of overnight.

    But when we speak of these performance increments, we're talking about "leaps" in processing performance, not bundling new versions of iTunes, iMessage, Photos, and Mail and calling it a new OS.

    WRT to BRU and performance on modern systems, from aclocal to test run, a current BRU build takes around 45 seconds under Linux, FreeBSD, or macOS and we get more impatient than ever :S

  6. Emile S

    21 Jan 2019 Europe (France, Strasbourg)

    The name of the game is… adaptation.

    A fast computer (as run for the first time) is nearly as fast as it will be six month later, but the user adapt its perception and six month later that computer does not seems to be as fast as the first time you ran it…

    Here I do not take into account any OS (version *) change(s), applications updates/upgrades, …

    * Usually, a new OS version is always slower than the previous version. I only saw once an exception to this rule: GS/OS 5 (yes, the Apple IIgs OS, back in 1989…).

  7. Sam R

    21 Jan 2019 Testers, Xojo Pro, Third Party Store Hengchun, Pingtung, Taiwan

    @Tim S This is a late 2012 Mini with 10Gig and a reasonably-sized SSD in addition to the internal drive. Why would I need to change it? Where's my motivation? It has the mobo connectors so a second drive could be added, likewise the memory was upgraded when I got it off eBay.

    That is the point I'm making. There is obviously nothing in Apple's line up that makes you want to upgrade. This is a problem for Apple.

    @Emile S * Usually, a new OS version is always slower than the previous version. I only saw once an exception to this rule: GS/OS 5 (yes, the Apple IIgs OS, back in 1989…).

    Yes this is the rule of thumb, logically as the OS gets more features it becomes bigger.

  8. Jeff T

    21 Jan 2019 Midlands of England, Europe

    There is obviously nothing in Apple's line up that makes you want to upgrade.

    +1
    Sad but true.

    I want a new MacBook with retina, and a decent range of slots.. 2 USB3, an SD Slot, normal Ethernet, HDMI, and some USB C
    So that I can walk into a meeting anywhere with some hope of being able to use my machine with 'their' kit.
    (If Im paying thousands for a machine, I object to having to pay hundreds more to use it with other hardware.)
    SSD drives are inexpensive now.
    So I don't want to see any 128Gb crippled machines, with a 500Gb option costing hundreds more.
    Start with 500Gb, why not - Windows spec machines ship with 1Tb and cost less.
    I want a keyboard where the keys won't stick or drop off.
    And if Im being honest, I don't care if it's unibody. I'd rather have a thicker model that comes apart so that I can upgrade the drive or the memory.

    Do that, and my money is waiting.
    The only reason I havent yet bought one of the Windows look-alikes is that it's easier to run MacOs on the real thing.

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