Updating a runtime to 64 bit on Mac?

  1. 4 months ago

    Hi,

    I'm not a Xojo programmer, but I use a little program on Mac that was written in RealBASIC, called FractionAction. I've tried contacting the developer, but his website is no longer up and I've had no luck finding him. The application is 32 bit, and Apple is soon discontinuing support of 32 bit apps.

    I was wondering if there is a way to update a runtime to 64 bit, without having the source code? Long shot, I know....

    Thanks,

    Tom

  2. Kem T

    Apr 13 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro, XDC Speakers New York

    Sorry, no, it has to be recompiled from the source. But maybe this is an opportunity for you to become a Xojo programmer. :)

  3. Gavin S

    Apr 13 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro UK
    Edited 4 months ago

    I'm afraid not, you'd need the source to recompile it. What was it about? Perhaps you could try making your own?

    Edit: Oh, beaten to it by 23 seconds. Also, great minds.

  4. Paul L

    Apr 13 Xojo Inc http://developer.xojo.com

    @Tom R The application is 32 bit, and Apple is soon discontinuing support of 32 bit apps.

    Keep in mind, although macOS 10.13.4 is showing a warning about 32-bit apps they will continue to work. And common understanding is that they will also continue to work in the next macOS release as well, albeit with perhaps more restrictions. It's important to plan ahead, but it's not likely to be an immediate problem soon.

  5. Emile S

    Apr 13 Europe (France, Strasbourg)

    And unlike if you update to High Sierra or to the next one, your application will not be impacted by that change.

  6. Dave S

    Apr 13 San Diego, California USA

    @Emile S And unlike if unless you update to High Sierra or to the next one, your application will not be impacted by that change.

  7. Sam R

    Apr 13 Pre-Release Testers, Xojo Pro Hengchun, Pingtung, Taiwan

    @Tom R I was wondering if there is a way to update a runtime to 64 bit, without having the source code? Long shot, I know....

    There's a difference between compiled and runtime based languages. Runtime makes it easier for the tool vendor to 'port' applications made with their tools to other platforms much easier; however this comes at a cost whereby the applications are slower (because they're converted from a human readable language to machine code on the fly), it also severally cripples their capabilities. I've worked with some developers who use competing tools to Xojo and none of them can ship applications on the Mac App Store as none of the runtimes support the requirements of it.

    Not to mention that in runtime based languages, the original source code tends to be human readable still, meaning that anyone looking to make a living from software development can have their application easily duplicated and rebranded.

    @Tom R The application is 32 bit, and Apple is soon discontinuing support of 32 bit apps.

    Apple have unofficially discontinued support for 32-Bit Carbon apps since macOS 10.10. 10.13 is said to be the last macOS version that would run 32-Bit applications without compromises (whatever that means).

    I do wonder if you could use a VM to run an older version of the macOS and therefor still retain 32-Bit compatibility.

  8. Thanks for all the great replies. Notwithstanding my confusion between runtimes and compiled applications, I had a feeling that you would need the source code to recompile.

    I took a few semesters of programming in college (C and a little bit of machine code). I do some work with FileMaker, and have become fairly good at scripting. So I think I wouldn't have too much trouble getting the hang of Xojo.

    The challenge is the nature of the program - it's called FractionAction, and runs on macOS; not sure whether there's a windows version. It can convert decimal numbers to fractions, reduce fractions, and perform mathematical operations on fractions and show the result as a fraction, rather than a decimal. So the challenge for me would be understanding the math and then programming it. It's available for free at http://mac.brothersoft.com/fractionaction-x.html .

    Anyway, I will keep my fingers crossed that FractionAction will continue to run on macOS for the foreseeable future. It's a great little utility that I rely on a lot for may day job, which requires me to calculate royalty payments that are based on fractions of fractions.

    Tom

  9. Dave S

    Apr 18 San Diego, California USA

    I just looked at that app..... with no manual, it is rather difficult to determine all that it does....
    but the "math" is nothing "special".....

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